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Lasers in Medical Science

, Volume 29, Issue 2, pp 607–614 | Cite as

Temperature monitoring and lesion volume estimation during double-applicator laser-induced thermotherapy in ex vivo swine pancreas: a preliminary study

  • Paola Saccomandi
  • Emiliano SchenaEmail author
  • Francesco Giurazza
  • Riccardo Del Vescovo
  • Michele A. Caponero
  • Luca Mortato
  • Francesco Panzera
  • Roberto L. Cazzato
  • Francesco R. Grasso
  • Francesco M. Di Matteo
  • Sergio Silvestri
  • Bruno B. Zobel
Original Article

Abstract

Tissue temperature distribution plays a crucial role in the outcome of laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT), a technique employed for neoplasias removal. Since recent studies proposed LITT for pancreatic tumors treatment, assessment of temperature and of its effects around the laser applicator could be useful to define optimal laser settings. The aims of this work are temperature monitoring and measurement of ablated tissue volume in an ex vivo porcine pancreas undergoing double-applicator LITT. A three-dimensional numerical model is implemented to predict temperature rise and volumes of ablated tissue in treated pancreas. Experiments are performed to validate the model, with two modalities: (1) 12-fiber Bragg grating sensors are adopted to monitor the heating and cooling during LITT at several distances from the applicators tip, and (2) 1.5-T MR imaging is used to estimate the ablated volume. Experimental data agree with theoretical ones: at 2 mm from both applicators tips, the maximum temperature increase is approximately 60 °C downward from the tips, while it increases of about 40 °C and 30 °C, respectively, at the level and upward from the tips. This behavior occurs also at other distances, proving that the tissue downward from the tip is mostly heated. Furthermore, the estimated volume with MRI agrees with theoretical one (i.d., 0.91 ± 0.09 vs. 0.95 cm3). The encouraging results indicate that the model could be a suitable tool to choose the optimal laser settings, in order to control the volume of ablated tissue.

Keywords

Laser-induced thermotherapy Pancreas cancer Laser–tissue interaction Fiber optic sensors 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank ITAL GM srl for the precious support provided.

Conflicts of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paola Saccomandi
    • 1
  • Emiliano Schena
    • 1
    Email author
  • Francesco Giurazza
    • 2
  • Riccardo Del Vescovo
    • 2
  • Michele A. Caponero
    • 3
  • Luca Mortato
    • 2
  • Francesco Panzera
    • 4
  • Roberto L. Cazzato
    • 2
  • Francesco R. Grasso
    • 2
  • Francesco M. Di Matteo
    • 4
  • Sergio Silvestri
    • 1
  • Bruno B. Zobel
    • 2
  1. 1.Unit of Measurements and Biomedical InstrumentationUniversità Campus Bio-Medico di RomaRomeItaly
  2. 2.Radiology DepartmentUniversità Campus Bio-Medico di RomaRomeItaly
  3. 3.Photonics Micro- and Nano-structures LaboratoryResearch Centre of Frascati, ENEAFrascatiItaly
  4. 4.Endoscopy DepartmentUniversità Campus Bio-Medico di RomaRomeItaly

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