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Lasers in Medical Science

, Volume 28, Issue 4, pp 1113–1117 | Cite as

Low-level visible light (LLVL) irradiation promotes proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells

  • Anat Lipovsky
  • Uri Oron
  • Aharon Gedanken
  • Rachel LubartEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

Low-level visible light irradiation was found to stimulate proliferation potential of various types of cells in vitro. Stem cells in general are of significance for implantation in regenerative medicine. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of low-level light irradiation on the proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). MSCs were isolated from the bone marrow, and light irradiation was applied at energy densities of 2.4, 4.8, and 7.2 J/cm2. Illumination of the MSCs resulted in almost twofold increase in cell number as compared to controls. Elevated reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide production was also observed in MSCs cultures following illumination with broadband visible light. The present study clearly demonstrates the ability of broadband visible light illumination to promote proliferation of MSCs in vitro. These results may have an important impact on wound healing.

Keywords

Mesenchymal stem cells Proliferation Visible light 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors wish to thank Dr. Tuby H. and Maltz L. for their help with the isolation of MSC.

Conflict of interest

All authors have completed and submitted the ICMJE Form for Disclosure of Potential Conflicts of Interest and none were reported.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Ltd 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anat Lipovsky
    • 3
  • Uri Oron
    • 2
  • Aharon Gedanken
    • 3
  • Rachel Lubart
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Departments of Chemistry and PhysicsBar-Ilan UniversityRamat-GanIsrael
  2. 2.Department of Zoology, The George S. Wise Faculty of Life SciencesTel-Aviv UniversityTel-AvivIsrael
  3. 3.Department of Chemistry, Kanbar Laboratory for Nanomaterials, Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced MaterialsBar-Ilan UniversityRamat-GanIsrael

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