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Clean Technologies and Environmental Policy

, Volume 13, Issue 1, pp 63–69 | Cite as

Pragmatic policy options for monitoring the movement of carbon dioxide derived from fossil and bio-fuels

  • M. Fehr
  • A. L. S. Costa
  • A. P. Martins
  • P. C. A. Oliveira
  • M. K. A. Silva
Perspective

Abstract

At a municipal level it was required to determine the course of environmental action that would respond to international directives regarding air quality control through interference in carbon dioxide movement. Two options were considered, namely bio-fuels and ecological compensation. The bio-fuel option was examined by way of ethanol produced from sugar cane. The compensation option was examined by way of the creation of a petroleum forest that would capture fossil fuel derived carbon dioxide. It inquired into the tree population needed to make the compensation theory work in practice. Worldwide scenarios were established, from which ideas for local administrations were then derived. The carbon dioxide cycle for ethanol was shown to close. To achieve complete ecological compensation, it was found necessary that each person plant 37 trees every 20 years. The arable land required was estimated as 4.0 and 2.5% of the globally available area for the two options, respectively.

Keywords

Air quality Bio-fuel Carbon balance Carbon dioxide Carbon dioxide sequestration Ecological compensation 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Fehr
    • 1
  • A. L. S. Costa
    • 1
  • A. P. Martins
    • 1
  • P. C. A. Oliveira
    • 1
  • M. K. A. Silva
    • 1
  1. 1.Federal University at UberlândiaUberlândiaBrazil

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