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Incidence, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis bacteremia in a tertiary hospital: comparison with S. agalactiae bacteremia

  • Joung Ha Park
  • Jiwon Jung
  • Min Jae Kim
  • Heungsup Sung
  • Mi-Na Kim
  • Yong Pil Chong
  • Sung-Han Kim
  • Sang-Oh Lee
  • Yang Soo Kim
  • Jun Hee Woo
  • Sang-Ho ChoiEmail author
Original Article
  • 147 Downloads

Abstract

The clinical characteristics and outcomes of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis (SDSE) bacteremia cases have not been adequately evaluated. We retrospectively enrolled consecutive adult patients with SDSE or S. agalactiae (group B streptococci, GBS) bacteremia at a tertiary care hospital (Republic of Korea) from August 2012 to December 2016. We compared the incidence, seasonality, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of 52 SDSE bacteremia cases with 151 GBS bacteremia cases. The incidence of SDSE and GBS bacteremia in these patients was 1.28/100,000 and 4.22/100,000 person-days, respectively. Most SDSE bacteremia cases were of community-onset infection (SDSE 94.2% vs GBS 83.4%; p = 0.052). Lancefield group G was the most common bacteria type among SDSE isolates (43/47; 91.5%). Patients with SDSE bacteremia were older (median, 68.0 years vs 61.0 years; p = 0.03). In both groups, solid tumor was the most common underlying disease, and more than half of the patients were immunocompromised (51.9% vs 54.3%; p = 0.77). Chronic kidney disease was more common in the SDSE group (19.2% vs 5.3%; p < 0.01). Cellulitis was the most common clinical syndrome of SDSE bacteremia and was more common in the SDSE group (59.6% vs 29.1%; p < 0.01). SDSE bacteremia cases occurred more frequently in the warm season compared with GBS bacteremia cases (65.4% vs 37.1%; p < 0.01); in-hospital mortalities were not significantly different between the groups (3.8% vs 10.6%; p = 0.17). In conclusion, SDSE bacteremia is commonly associated with cellulitis, especially in older and immunocompromised patients during the warm season.

Keywords

Streptococcus dysgalactiae Streptococcus agalactiae Bacteremia Cellulitis 

Notes

Funding information

This research received no specific grant from any funding agency in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joung Ha Park
    • 1
  • Jiwon Jung
    • 1
  • Min Jae Kim
    • 1
  • Heungsup Sung
    • 2
  • Mi-Na Kim
    • 2
  • Yong Pil Chong
    • 1
  • Sung-Han Kim
    • 1
  • Sang-Oh Lee
    • 1
  • Yang Soo Kim
    • 1
  • Jun Hee Woo
    • 1
  • Sang-Ho Choi
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Infectious DiseasesAsan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of MedicineSeoulRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Department of Laboratory MedicineAsan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of MedicineSeoulRepublic of Korea

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