Initial antifungal strategy does not correlate with mortality in patients with candidemia

  • R. Murri
  • G. Scoppettuolo
  • G. Ventura
  • M. Fabbiani
  • F. Giovannenze
  • F. Taccari
  • E. Milozzi
  • B. Posteraro
  • M. Sanguinetti
  • R. Cauda
  • M. Fantoni
Original Article

Abstract

The incidence of Candida bloodstream infections (BSIs) has increased over time, especially in medical wards. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of different antifungal treatment strategies on 30-day mortality in patients with Candida BSI not admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) at disease onset. This prospective, monocentric, cohort study was conducted at an 1100-bed university hospital in Rome, Italy, where an infectious disease consultation team was implemented. All cases of Candida BSIs observed in adult patients from November 2012 to April 2014 were included. Patients were grouped according to the initial antifungal strategy: fluconazole, echinocandin, or liposomal amphotericin B. Cox regression analysis was used to identify risk factors significantly associated with 15-day and 30-day mortality. During the study period, 130 patients with candidemia were observed (58 % with C. albicans, 7 % with C. glabrata, and 23 % with C. parapsilosis). The first antifungal drug was fluconazole for 40 % of patients, echinocandin for 57.0 %, and liposomal amphotericin B for 4 %. During follow-up, 33 % of patients died. The cumulative mortality 30 days after the candidemia episode was 30.8 % and was similar among groups. In the Cox regression analysis, clinical presentation was the only independent factor associated with 15-day mortality, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score and clinical presentation were the independent factors associated with 30-day mortality. No differences in 15-day and 30-day mortality were observed between patients with and without C. albicans candidemia. In patients with candidemia admitted to medical or surgical wards, clinical severity but not the initial antifungal strategy were significantly correlated with mortality.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Murri
    • 1
  • G. Scoppettuolo
    • 1
  • G. Ventura
    • 1
  • M. Fabbiani
    • 1
  • F. Giovannenze
    • 1
  • F. Taccari
    • 1
  • E. Milozzi
    • 1
  • B. Posteraro
    • 2
  • M. Sanguinetti
    • 3
  • R. Cauda
    • 1
  • M. Fantoni
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Infectious DiseasesCatholic University of RomeRomeItaly
  2. 2.Institute of Public Health, Section of HygieneCatholic University of RomeRomeItaly
  3. 3.Institute of MicrobiologyCatholic University of RomeRomeItaly

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