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Influence of procalcitonin on decision to start antibiotic treatment in patients with a lower respiratory tract infection: insight from the observational multicentric ProREAL surveillance

  • F. Dusemund
  • B. Bucher
  • S. Meyer
  • R. Thomann
  • F. Kühn
  • S. Bassetti
  • M. Sprenger
  • E. Baechli
  • T. Sigrist
  • M. Schwietert
  • D. Amin
  • P. Hausfater
  • E. Carre
  • P. Schuetz
  • J. Gaillat
  • K. Regez
  • R. Bossart
  • U. Schild
  • B. Müller
  • W. C. Albrich
  • For the ProREAL study team
Article

Abstract

Procalcitonin (PCT)-guided antibiotic stewardship is a successful strategy to decrease antibiotic use. We assessed if clinical judgement affected compliance with a PCT-algorithm for antibiotic prescribing in a multicenter surveillance of patients with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI).

Initiation and duration of antibiotic therapy, adherence to a PCT algorithm and outcome were monitored in consecutive adults with LRTI who were enrolled in a prospective observational quality control. We correlated initial clinical judgment of the treating physician with algorithm compliance and assessed the influence of PCT on the final decision to initiate antibiotic therapy.

PCT levels correlated with physicians’ estimates of the likelihood of bacterial infection (p for trend <0.02). PCT influenced the post-test probability of antibiotic initiation with a greater effect in patients with non-pneumonia LRTI (e.g., for bronchitis: −23 % if PCT ≤ 0.25 μg/L and +31 % if PCT > 0.25 μg/L), in European centers (e.g., in France −22 % if PCT ≤ 0.25 μg/L and +13 % if PCT > 0.25 μg/L) and in centers, which had previous experience with the PCT-algorithm (−16 % if PCT ≤ 0.25 μg/L and +19 % if PCT > 0.25 μg/L). Algorithm non-compliance, i.e. antibiotic prescribing despite low PCT-levels, was independently predicted by the likelihood of a bacterial infection as judged by the treating physician. Compliance was significantly associated with identification of a bacterial etiology (p = 0.01).

Compliance with PCT-guided antibiotic stewardship was affected by geographically and culturally-influenced subjective clinical judgment. Initiation of antibiotic therapy was altered by PCT levels. Differential compliance with antibiotic stewardship efforts contributes to geographical differences in antibiotic prescribing habits and potentially influences antibiotic resistance rates.

Keywords

Antibiotic Therapy Community Acquire Pneumonia Lower Respiratory Tract Infection Antibiotic Prescribe Lower Respiratory Tract Infection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgement

We are grateful to all of the patients, physicians and nursing staff from the centers who participated in this survey.

Conflict of Interest

Drs Albrich, Schuetz, and Mueller have received support from BRAHMS AG to attend meetings and fulfill speaking engagements. Dr Amin has received speaking honoraria from bioMérieux. Drs Albrich and Mueller have received support from bioMérieux to attend meetings. Dr Mueller has served as a consultant to and received research support from BRAHMS AG and bioMérieux.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Dusemund
    • 1
  • B. Bucher
    • 1
  • S. Meyer
    • 1
  • R. Thomann
    • 2
    • 12
  • F. Kühn
    • 3
  • S. Bassetti
    • 3
  • M. Sprenger
    • 4
  • E. Baechli
    • 4
  • T. Sigrist
    • 5
  • M. Schwietert
    • 6
  • D. Amin
    • 7
  • P. Hausfater
    • 8
  • E. Carre
    • 9
  • P. Schuetz
    • 10
  • J. Gaillat
    • 11
  • K. Regez
    • 1
  • R. Bossart
    • 1
  • U. Schild
    • 1
  • B. Müller
    • 1
  • W. C. Albrich
    • 1
  • For the ProREAL study team
  1. 1.Medical University DepartmentKantonsspital AarauAarauSwitzerland
  2. 2.Division of MedicineSolothurnSwitzerland
  3. 3.Division of MedicineOltenSwitzerland
  4. 4.Division of MedicineUsterSwitzerland
  5. 5.Division of PulmonologyKlinik BarmelweidBarmelweidSwitzerland
  6. 6.Medical University DepartmentLiestalSwitzerland
  7. 7.Morton Plant HospitalClearwaterUSA
  8. 8.Division of MedicineHôpital Pitié-SalpétriêreParisFrance
  9. 9.Baume-les-DamesFrance
  10. 10.Harvard School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  11. 11.Service des Maladies Infectieuses Centre Hospitalier de la Région d’AnnecyAnnecyFrance
  12. 12.Division of Internal MedicineUniversity Hospital BaselBaselSwitzerland

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