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Evaluation of an immunochromatographic assay: Giardia-Strip® (Coris BioConcept) for detection of Giardia intestinalis in human fecal specimens

  • T. K. T. Nguyen
  • H. Kherouf
  • V. Blanc-Pattin
  • E. Allais
  • Y. Chevalier
  • A. Richez
  • C. Ramade
  • F. PeyronEmail author
Letter to the Editor

Introduction

Giardiasis is a ubiquitous intestinal parasitic disease that affects up to 30% of the population in developing countries [1]. It has also been reported to be the leading cause of outbreaks of waterborne disease in the USA [2]. Infection is transmitted by the ingestion of cysts, which are parasitic stages that are resistant to chlorination and can remain viable for several weeks [3]. The following routes of infection have been identified: travel in endemic countries, consumption of tap water, consumption of raw vegetables, and swimming in rivers and lakes [4]. Most infected people remain asymptomatic, which contributes to the spread of the disease [5]. In some cases, especially in children, infection can lead to a wide range of symptoms, including abdominal discomfort and watery diarrhea; in severe cases, malnutrition, malabsorption and disruption of the weight curve may be observed.

Giardiasis is usually diagnosed in fecal specimens by light microscopy, which remains the...

Keywords

Fecal Sample Intestinal Parasite Giardiasis Polymerase Chain Reaction Testing Fecal Specimen 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. K. T. Nguyen
    • 1
  • H. Kherouf
    • 1
  • V. Blanc-Pattin
    • 1
  • E. Allais
    • 1
  • Y. Chevalier
    • 1
  • A. Richez
    • 1
  • C. Ramade
    • 1
  • F. Peyron
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Laboratory of ParasitologyCroix-Rousse HospitalLyonFrance

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