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Identification of gentian violet concentration that does not stain oral mucosa, possesses anti-candidal activity and is well tolerated

  • R. J. Jurevic
  • R. S. Traboulsi
  • P. K. Mukherjee
  • R. A. Salata
  • M. A. Ghannoum
  • Oral HIV/AIDS Research Alliance Mycology Focus group
Article

Abstract

Gentian violet (GV) is recommended for initial treatment of oral candidiasis in HIV-infected patients in resource-limited settings. Currently GV is not used because of its staining effects. In this study, we investigated the staining capacity of three different concentrations of GV to determine a concentration that does not cause staining. The selected concentration that did not cause staining was evaluated for its physical stability and antifungal activity. Fifteen healthy participants were randomized to rinse twice daily for 14 days with one of three GV concentrations: 0.1%, 0.0085%, or 0.00165%. Oral examination and intra-oral photographs were performed at baseline and at the end of therapy. Participants responded to a questionnaire to assess adverse events. Antifungal activity was evaluated using the Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute methodology. GV at a concentration of 0.00165% did not stain the oral mucosa and was well tolerated. GV at a concentration of 0.00165% was stable and possessed antifungal activity when stored at certain temperatures for different time periods. Gentian violet solution at the concentration of 0.00165% does not stain the oral mucosa, is stable and possesses potent antifungal activity.

Keywords

Antifungal Activity Oral Mucosa Nystatin Oral Candidiasis Amber Bottle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work is supported by a grant from the National Institute of Health BRS-ACURE Q0600136 (Oral HIV/AIDS Research Alliance, OHARA) to MAG, and the National Institute of Dental and Cranial Research number 1P01DE019759-01 and 1K23DE016110-01A1 to RJJ.

Conflict of interest

All authors declare no conflicts.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. J. Jurevic
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. S. Traboulsi
    • 1
    • 3
  • P. K. Mukherjee
    • 1
  • R. A. Salata
    • 3
  • M. A. Ghannoum
    • 1
  • Oral HIV/AIDS Research Alliance Mycology Focus group
  1. 1.Center for Medical MycologyCase Western Reserve University, University Hospitals Case Medical CenterClevelandUSA
  2. 2.Department of Biological Sciences, School of Dental MedicineCase Western Reserve UniversityClevelandUSA
  3. 3.Division of Infectious Diseases and HIV MedicineCase Western Reserve University, University Hospitals Case Medical CenterClevelandUSA

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