Risk factors for, and clinical relevance of, faecal extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-EC) carriage in neutropenic patients with haematological malignancies

  • M. Arnan
  • C. Gudiol
  • L. Calatayud
  • J. Liñares
  • M. Á. Dominguez
  • M. Batlle
  • J. M. Ribera
  • J. Carratalà
  • F. Gudiol
Article

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess the risk factors for, and the clinical relevance of, faecal carriage by extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-EC) in neutropenic cancer patients (NCP). An observational prospective multicentre cohort study was conducted over 2 years at two teaching hospitals. Patients with acute leukaemia or undergoing stem cell transplantation were included during neutropenia episodes. Rectal swabs were obtained at hospital admission and weekly thereafter until discharge or death. ESBL-EC colonized episodes were compared with non-colonized episodes. ESBL-EC strains were studied by PCR and isoelectric focusing, and molecular typing was performed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Among 217 episodes of neutropenia, the prevalence of ESBL-EC faecal carriage was 29% (14% at hospital admission). Multivariate analysis identified previous antibiotics as the only independent risk factor for ESBL-EC faecal colonization (OR 5.38; 95% CI 2.79–10.39). Analysis of ESBL-EC isolates revealed a polyclonal distribution with CTX-M predominance (81.3%). E. coli bacteraemia was mainly caused by non-ESBL producing strains and its rate was similar in both groups (13% vs. 11%). We found no association between ESBL-EC carriage and an increased risk of ESBL-EC bacteremia or a negative influence on other clinical outcomes, including length of hospitalisation, early and overall mortality rates. ESBL-EC faecal colonization is frequent in NCP but difficult to identify by epidemiological or clinical features on presentation. Prior antibiotic therapy is the major associated risk factor. In this setting colonization does not appear to have a significant clinical relevance. Thus, routine testing for ESBL-EC faecal carriage does not seem to be beneficial.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Arnan
    • 1
  • C. Gudiol
    • 2
    • 3
  • L. Calatayud
    • 4
    • 5
  • J. Liñares
    • 4
    • 5
  • M. Á. Dominguez
    • 4
  • M. Batlle
    • 6
  • J. M. Ribera
    • 6
  • J. Carratalà
    • 2
    • 3
  • F. Gudiol
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Hematology DepartmentHospital Duran i Reynals, l´Hospitalet de LlobregatBarcelonaSpain
  2. 2.Infectious Disease DepartmentHospital Universitari de Bellvitge, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat, University of BarcelonaBarcelonaSpain
  3. 3.REIPI (Spanish Network for Research in Infectious Diseases)Instituto de Salud Carlos IIIMadridSpain
  4. 4.Microbiology DepartmentHospital Universitari de Bellvitge, l´Hospitalet de LlobregatBarcelonaSpain
  5. 5.Ciber de Enfermedades Respiratorias, ISCIIIMadridSpain
  6. 6.Haematology DepartmentHospital Germans Trias i PujolBadalona, BarcelonaSpain

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