In vitro activity of daptomycin against Staphylococci isolated from bacteremia and community-onset skin and soft tissue infections in France: data from two nationwide studies

  • O. Gallon
  • C. Guillet-Caruba
  • B. Lamy
  • F. Laurent
  • F. Doucet-Populaire
  • J.-W. Decousser
  • Collège de Bactériologie Virologie Hygiène Study Group (ColBVH)
Article

Abstract

Staphylococci are a leading cause of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) and bacteremia in France, a country with a high prevalence of oxacillin resistance. We evaluated the in vitro activity of daptomycin compared with reference compounds against 445 Staphylococcus aureus and 53 coagulase-negative Staphylococci (CNS) collected during two large nationwide studies performed in 2006 and 2007. The percentage of oxacillin resistance among S. aureus was 13.6% (SSTIs) and 30.7% (bacteremia). Daptomycin showed lower MIC90 levels compared to vancomycin, teicoplanin, and linezolid (0.19 mg/L vs. 2, 1.5, and 1 mg/L, respectively), irrespective of oxacillin susceptibility. Amongst the CNS, 64.2% of the isolates originated from clinical bacteremia were resistant to oxacillin and 24.5% to teicoplanin; all but one Staphylococci were susceptible to daptomycin (MIC = 1.5 mg/l). As with linezolid, daptomycin seems to constitute an alternative option to treat some staphylococcal infections in the French context of high oxacillin resistance prevalence and high glycopeptides MIC.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was partially funded by a grant from Novartis, France.

The ColBVH study group participants are: Drs. ALBA SAUVIAT C, AUVRAY C, BARTIZEL C, BAUDINAT I, BENABID E, BENSEDDIK Z, BESSIS F, BIESSY H, BIETRIX M, BLANC V, BLAND S, BOUCAUD MY, BOUQUIGNY C, BRISOU P, CAILLEAUX V, CANCET B, CARTIER-RIVIERE B, CATTIER B, CECILLE A, CHAMBREUIL G, CHAPLAIN C, CHARDON H, CHIOUKH N, COLLOT E, CREPET F, DE MONTCLOS H, DELARBRE J, ESTEVE V, GRAVET A, DELIGNE D, DEMACHY MC, DOAT V, DUBOURDIEU B, DUBOURDIEU S, DURAND C, EL HARRIF-HERAUD, EVREUX F, FONSALE N, GABRIEL S, GAVIGNET M, GEFFROY F, GRAVET A, GRISE G, GUIET P, HERMES I, HEURTE J, HEUSSE E, JACOB JL, MENOUNI O, RIGAL C, JAN D, JAOUEN E, KHATIB G, LAFARGUE JP, LAMARCIA R, LAMY B, LAURENS E, LEBRUN C, LE COUSTUMIER, LECAILLON E, LEMBLE C, LEOTARD S, LETOUZEY MN, MANDJEE A, MANGEOL A, MARMONIER A, MARTIN R, MENOUAR M, MENOUNI ODILE V, MICHEL A, NERI D, NOULARD MJ, PALETTE X, PANGON B, PAYEN C, PIERREJEAN D, POLLET J, PORCHERET H, POSSON M, RAOULT A, RICHARDIN F, RIGAL C, SABOT O, SAMAILLE S, SANCHEZ R, SCAT Y, SECHER A, SIMEON D, THELLIER JP, TOURRANS B, VACHEE A, VASSEUR, VERDIER I, VERHAEGHE A, VILLEMAIN M, VILLENEUVE L.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • O. Gallon
    • 1
  • C. Guillet-Caruba
    • 2
  • B. Lamy
    • 3
  • F. Laurent
    • 4
    • 5
  • F. Doucet-Populaire
    • 2
    • 6
  • J.-W. Decousser
    • 2
  • Collège de Bactériologie Virologie Hygiène Study Group (ColBVH)
  1. 1.Department of Biology and Infection ControlCentre Hospitalier de DourdanDourdanFrance
  2. 2.Department of Microbiology and Infection ControlAP-HP, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Antoine BéclèreClamartFrance
  3. 3.Department of BiologyCentre Hospitalier du Bassin de ThauSèteFrance
  4. 4.Centre National de Référence des StaphylocoquesFaculté Laennec, INSERM 851LyonFrance
  5. 5.Department of BacteriologyHôpital de la Croix RousseLyonFrance
  6. 6.Department of Microbiology, EA 4065, Faculté des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et BiologiquesUniversité Paris DescartesParisFrance

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