Grimontia hollisae, a potential agent of gastroenteritis and bacteraemia in the Mediterranean area

  • S. Edouard
  • A. Daumas
  • S. Branger
  • J.-M. Durand
  • D. Raoult
  • P.-E. Fournier
Brief Report

Abstract

Vibrio hollisae was first described in 1982 as an agent of diarrhoea and was reclassified in 2003 into a novel genus as Grimontia hollisae. We report the first case of G. hollisae bacteraemia in the Mediterranean area, in an 81-year-old man with a severe gastroenteritis and hepatitis following the consumption of raw oysters. The incidence of this micro-organism as an agent of gastroenteritis may be underestimated because it may not be detected using routine culture conditions.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Edouard
    • 1
  • A. Daumas
    • 2
  • S. Branger
    • 2
  • J.-M. Durand
    • 2
  • D. Raoult
    • 1
    • 3
  • P.-E. Fournier
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Fédération de Microbiologie Clinique, Hôpital de la TimoneMarseilleFrance
  2. 2.Service de Médecine Interne, Hôpital de la ConceptionMarseilleFrance
  3. 3.Unite des Rickettsies et Pathogènes EmergentsCNRS-IRD UMR6236, Faculte de MedecineMarseilleFrance

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