Occurrence and characterization of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar 9,12:l,v:- strains from Bulgaria, Denmark, and the United States

  • P. Petrov
  • R. S. Hendriksen
  • T. Kantardjiev
  • G. Asseva
  • G. Sørensen
  • P. Fields
  • M. Mikoleit
  • J. Whichard
  • J. R. McQuiston
  • M. Torpdahl
  • F. M. Aarestrup
  • F. J. Angulo
Article

Abstract

In 2006, Salmonella enterica serovar I 9,12:l,v:- emerged in Bulgaria. The aim of this study was to characterize Salmonella serovar I 9,12:l,v:- isolates from Bulgaria, Denmark, and the United States. We compared isolates of Salmonella I 9,12:l,v:- and diphasic serovars with similar antigenic formulas by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and antimicrobial susceptibility. The phase 2 flagellin gene (fljB) was also sequenced for selected isolates. By PFGE, the Salmonella I 9,12:l,v:- isolates from Bulgaria were indistinguishable from the isolate from the United States and distinct from isolates from Denmark; furthermore, several Salmonella I 9,12:l,v:- were indistinguishable from an isolate of Salmonella serovar Goettingen. Sequence analysis showed 100% sequence identity with known H:e,n,z15 sequences of Salmonella Goettingen, which has the antigenic formula I 9,12:l,v:e,n,z15. The study indicated that Salmonella I 9,12:l,v:- is a monophasic variant of Salmonella Goettingen and is present in different countries and on different continents.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Petrov
    • 1
  • R. S. Hendriksen
    • 2
  • T. Kantardjiev
    • 1
  • G. Asseva
    • 1
  • G. Sørensen
    • 2
  • P. Fields
    • 3
  • M. Mikoleit
    • 3
  • J. Whichard
    • 3
  • J. R. McQuiston
    • 3
  • M. Torpdahl
    • 5
  • F. M. Aarestrup
    • 2
  • F. J. Angulo
    • 4
  1. 1.National Reference Laboratory for Enteric PathogensNational Center of Infectious and Parasitic DiseasesSofiaBulgaria
  2. 2.WHO Collaborating Centre for Antimicrobial Resistance in Foodborne Pathogens and Community Reference Laboratory for Antimicrobial Resistance, National Food InstituteTechnical University of Denmark (DTU Food)CopenhagenDenmark
  3. 3.Enteric Diseases Laboratory Branch, Division of Foodborne, Bacterial and Mycotic Diseases (DFBMD)Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)AtlantaUSA
  4. 4.Enteric Diseases Epidemiology Branch, DFBMDCenters for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)AtlantaUSA
  5. 5.Department of Bacteriology, Mycology and ParasitologyStatens Serum InstituteCopenhagenDenmark

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