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Invasive pneumococcal disease in children up to 5 years of age in Poland

  • P. Grzesiowski
  • A. Skoczynska
  • P. Albrecht
  • R. Konior
  • M. Patrzalek
  • M. Sadowska
  • J. Staroszczyk
  • L. Szenborn
  • J. Wysocki
  • W. Hryniewicz
  • Polish Pediatric IPD Group
Brief Report

Introduction

Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the leading pathogens causing invasive disease in children worldwide. We have previously published a study on nasopharyngeal carriage in children from different settings in Poland [1]. Here, we present results of the prospective study on laboratory-confirmed invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and S. pneumoniae serotype distribution in children up to 5 years of age in Poland.

Objectives

The study was undertaken to collect data on the incidence and outcome of IPD, invasive S. pneumoniae serotype distribution and antimicrobial resistance in hospitalised children up to 5 years of age. Additionally, the serotype coverage by the currently available 7-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine and two other conjugate vaccines (10-valent and 13-valent) soon to be expected on the market was assessed.

Materials and methods

Between January 2003 and December 2004, data on IPD cases were collected prospectively and analysed by the coordinating centre. The...

Keywords

Meningitis Invasive Pneumococcal Disease Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing Meningitis Case Serotype Distribution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank all of the participating pediatric wards and laboratories for the reporting of the invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) cases. The study was partially supported by an unrestricted grant from Wyeth, Warsaw, Poland.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Grzesiowski
    • 1
  • A. Skoczynska
    • 1
  • P. Albrecht
    • 2
  • R. Konior
    • 3
  • M. Patrzalek
    • 4
  • M. Sadowska
    • 5
  • J. Staroszczyk
    • 5
  • L. Szenborn
    • 6
  • J. Wysocki
    • 7
  • W. Hryniewicz
    • 1
  • Polish Pediatric IPD Group
  1. 1.Coordinating Centre: National Medicines InstituteWarsawPoland
  2. 2.The Medical University of WarsawWarsawPoland
  3. 3.Specialty Children’s HospitalKrakowPoland
  4. 4.Specialty Children’s HospitalKielcePoland
  5. 5.WyethWarsawPoland
  6. 6.The Medical University of WroclawWroclawPoland
  7. 7.The Medical University of PoznanPoznanPoland

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