Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in hospitals in Tbilisi, the Republic of Georgia, are variants of the Brazilian clone

  • M. D. Bartels
  • A. Nanuashvili
  • K. Boye
  • S. M. Rohde
  • N. Jashiashvili
  • N. A. Faria
  • M. Kereselidze
  • S. Kharebava
  • H. Westh
Brief Report

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to characterise methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates from the Republic of Georgia, part of the former Soviet Union. Thirty-two non-duplicate MRSA isolates were collected in the period from May 2006 to February 2007. The patient data were analysed and the isolates were characterised by staphylococcal protein A (spa) typing, staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec (SCCmec) typing, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and the detection of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes. Only two closely related spa types were found; 29 isolates were of spa type 459 and three were t030. The spa types belonged to sequence type (ST) 239, clonal complex (CC) 8. All isolates were multiresistant, PVL-negative and harboured SCCmec type IIIA. Based on the molecular findings and PFGE, the isolates most closely resembled the pandemic Brazilian clone (ST239-IIIA).

Supplementary material

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. D. Bartels
    • 1
  • A. Nanuashvili
    • 2
  • K. Boye
    • 1
  • S. M. Rohde
    • 1
  • N. Jashiashvili
    • 2
  • N. A. Faria
    • 3
  • M. Kereselidze
    • 4
  • S. Kharebava
    • 4
  • H. Westh
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Clinical MicrobiologyHvidovre HospitalHvidovreDenmark
  2. 2.Tbilisi State Medical UniversityTbilisiRepublic of Georgia
  3. 3.Laboratório de Genética Molecular, Instituto de Tecnologia Química e BiológicaUniversidade Nova de Lisboa (ITQB/UNL)OeirasPortugal
  4. 4.Medical Center CITOTbilisiRepublic of Georgia

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