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Pneumococcal surface protein A family types of Streptococcus pneumoniae from community-acquired pneumonia patients in Japan

  • Y. Ito
  • M. Osawa
  • R. Isozumi
  • S. Imai
  • I. Ito
  • T. Hirai
  • T. Ishida
  • S. Ichiyama
  • M. Mishima
  • Kansai Community Acquired Pneumococcal Pneumonia Study Group
Concise Article

Abstract

We assessed pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) family types of 141 isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae from community-acquired pneumonia patients in Japan. Families 1 and 2 were expressed in 78 (55.3%) and 58 (41.1%) isolates, respectively. Five isolates were not typed either as family 1 or 2. PspA family types were not associated with age, sex, or pneumonia severity. Penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae was more likely to belong to family 2 whereas organisms highly resistant to erythromycin and positive for ermB were more prevalent in family 1. The association of PspA type with antimicrobial resistance was possibly affected by prevalent serotypes or resistance clones. It would therefore be necessary to include both family 1 and 2 proteins in a PspA-containing vaccine to cover the major PspA families and to reduce antimicrobial resistance.

Keywords

Minimum Inhibitory Concentration Invasive Pneumococcal Disease Pneumococcal Pneumonia Pneumonia Severity Index Pneumococcal Isolate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

Kansai Community Acquired Pneumococcal Pneumonia Study Group includes the following investigators and centers: T. Ishida (Kurashiki Central Hospital), K. Tomii and I. Gohma (Kobe Japan Post Hospital), H. Tomioka (Nishi-Kobe Medical Center), M. Hayashi (Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital), H. Kagioka (Kitano Hospital), M. Hirabayashi (Hyogo Prefectural Tsukaguchi Hospital), K. Onaru (Sakai Municipal Hospital), K. Maniwa (Tenri Hospital), Y. Ito, T. Hirai, and M. Mishima (Kyoto University Hospital), I. Ito (Ono Municipal Hospital).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. Ito
    • 1
  • M. Osawa
    • 1
  • R. Isozumi
    • 1
  • S. Imai
    • 1
  • I. Ito
    • 1
  • T. Hirai
    • 1
  • T. Ishida
    • 2
  • S. Ichiyama
    • 3
  • M. Mishima
    • 1
  • Kansai Community Acquired Pneumococcal Pneumonia Study Group
  1. 1.Department of Respiratory Medicine, Graduate School of MedicineKyoto UniversitySakyo-ku, KyotoJapan
  2. 2.Kurashiki Central HospitalKurashiki-city, OkayamaJapan
  3. 3.Department of Clinical Laboratory Medicine, Graduate School of MedicineKyoto UniversitySakyo-ku, KyotoJapan

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