Soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 for distinguishing bacterial from aseptic meningitis in adults

  • J. Bishara
  • N. Hadari
  • M. Shalita-Chesner
  • Z. Samra
  • O. Ofir
  • M. Paul
  • N. Peled
  • S. Pitlik
  • Y. Molad
Concise Article

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (sTREM-1) is present in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with acute meningitis and if its presence can predict bacterial infection. We found elevated levels of sTREM-1 in the CSF of seven of the nine (78%) patients with culture-positive specimens and in none of 12 (0%) patients with culture-negative specimens (sensitivity: 78%; specificity: 100%). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for sTREM-1 in the CSF as a predictor for bacterial meningitis was 0.889. This suggests that sTREM-1 is upregulated in the CSF of patients with bacterial meningitis with high specificity and that its presence can potentially assist clinicians in the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Bishara
    • 1
  • N. Hadari
    • 2
  • M. Shalita-Chesner
    • 3
  • Z. Samra
    • 4
  • O. Ofir
    • 4
  • M. Paul
    • 1
  • N. Peled
    • 1
  • S. Pitlik
    • 1
    • 2
  • Y. Molad
    • 3
    • 5
  1. 1.Infectious Diseases Unit, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Hospital, Petah Tiqwa, Sackler Faculty of MedicineTel Aviv UniversityTel AvivIsrael
  2. 2.Department of Internal Medicine C, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Hospital, Petah Tiqwa, Sackler Faculty of MedicineTel Aviv UniversityTel AvivIsrael
  3. 3.The Laboratory of Inflammation Research, Felsenstein Medical Research Center, Petah Tiqwa, Sackler Faculty of MedicineTel Aviv UniversityTel AvivIsrael
  4. 4.Laboratory of Clinical Microbiology, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Hospital, PetahTiqwa, Sackler Faculty of MedicineTel Aviv UniversityTel AvivIsrael
  5. 5.Unit of Rheumatology, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Hospital, PetahTiqwa, Sackler Faculty of MedicineTel Aviv UniversityTel AvivIsrael

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