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Trends in Shigella outbreaks in the Israeli military over 15 years

  • M. HuertaEmail author
  • M. J. Schwaber
  • N. Davidovitch
  • R. D. Balicer
  • Y. Zelikovitch
  • D. Cohen
  • I. Grotto
Brief Report

A retrospective analysis was performed in order to detect trends in the role of Shigellain diarrheal outbreaks in the Israel Defense Force (IDF) over a 15-year period. Diarrhea was defined as the passage of three or more watery stools within a 24-h period. Diarrheal outbreaks were defined as events meeting any one of the following three defining criteria: (i) ten or more persons in a single unit developing diarrhea in a single day; (ii) 15 or more persons in a single unit developing diarrhea over a 2-day period; or (iii) 25% of the personnel in a single unit developing diarrhea within a 7-day period. Diarrheal outbreaks are a notifiable disease in the IDF, and the reporting mechanism, which remained unchanged throughout the study period, is comprehensive and nearly complete. Laboratory investigation of outbreaks is a routine component of the epidemiologic investigation, and bacteriologic culture protocols for stool and food samples remained constant throughout the study period. These...

Keywords

Bacterial Pathogen Personal Hygiene Shigellosis Israel Defense Force Significant Downward Trend 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Huerta
    • 1
    Email author
  • M. J. Schwaber
    • 1
  • N. Davidovitch
    • 1
  • R. D. Balicer
    • 1
  • Y. Zelikovitch
    • 1
  • D. Cohen
    • 2
  • I. Grotto
    • 1
  1. 1.Israel Defense Force Medical CorpsArmy Health BranchIsrael
  2. 2.Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Sackler Faculty of MedicineTel Aviv UniversityIsrael

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