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Evaluation of a Commercial Line Probe Assay for Identification of Mycobacterium Species from Liquid and Solid Culture

  •  W. Mijs
  •  K. De Vreese
  •  A. Devos
  •  H. Pottel
  •  A. Valgaeren
  •  C. Evans
  •  J. Norton
  •  D. Parker
  •  L. Rigouts
  •  F. Portaels
  •  U. Reischl
  •  S. Watterson
  •  G. Pfyffer
  •  R. Rossau
Article

Abstract.

The performance of a commercial line probe assay (LiPA) (Inno-LiPA Mycobacteria; Innogenetics, Belgium) for the detection and identification of Mycobacterium species from liquid and solid culture was evaluated at five routine clinical laboratories. The LiPA method is based on the reverse hybridization principle, in which the mycobacterial 16S-23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) spacer region is amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Amplicons are subsequently hybridized with oligonucleotide probes arranged on a membrane strip and detected by a colorimetric system. The test detects the presence of Mycobacterium species and specifically identifies Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, Mycobacterium kansasii, Mycobacterium xenopi, Mycobacterium gordonae, Mycobacterium avium complex, Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, Mycobacterium scrofulaceum, and Mycobacterium chelonaeMycobacterium abscessus complex. The results of LiPA were compared with the results obtained using traditional biochemical and molecular tests (DNA probe-based techniques, PCR restriction enzyme analysis of the 65 kDa heat-shock protein gene, and sequencing of the 16S rDNA). A total of 669 isolates, 642 of which were identified as Mycobacterium species and 27 as non-Mycobacterium species, were tested by LiPA. After analysis of 14 initially discordant results and exclusion of one isolate, concordant results were obtained for 636 of 641 Mycobacterium isolates (99.2% accuracy). All Mycobacterium species reacted with the MYC (Mycobacterium species) probe (100% sensitivity), and all non-Mycobacterium species were identified as such (100% specificity).

Keywords

Mycobacterium Avium Mycobacterium Avium Complex Mycobacterium Species Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Complex Gordonae 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  •  W. Mijs
    • 1
  •  K. De Vreese
    • 1
  •  A. Devos
    • 1
  •  H. Pottel
    • 1
  •  A. Valgaeren
    • 1
  •  C. Evans
    • 2
  •  J. Norton
    • 2
  •  D. Parker
    • 2
  •  L. Rigouts
    • 3
  •  F. Portaels
    • 3
  •  U. Reischl
    • 4
  •  S. Watterson
    • 5
  •  G. Pfyffer
    • 6
  •  R. Rossau
    • 1
  1. 1.Innogenetics NV, Industriepark 7, Box 4, 9052 Ghent, Belgium
  2. 2.Murex Biotech Limited, Central Road, Temple Hill, Dartford DAI 5LR, UK
  3. 3.Mycobacteriology Unit, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nationalestraat 155, 2000 Antwerp, Belgium
  4. 4.Institut für Medizinische Mikrobiologie und Hygiene, Universität Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg, Germany
  5. 5.Public Health Laboratory Service Mycobacterium Reference Unit, Dulwich Public Health Laboratory and Department of Microbiology, King's College School of Medicine and Dentistry, King's College Hospital, East Dulwich Grove, London SE22 8QF, UK
  6. 6.Department of Medical Microbiology, Swiss National Center for Mycobacteria, University of Zurich, Gloriastrasse 30, 8028 Zurich, Switzerland

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