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Pan-European Study on Culture-Proven Legionnaires' Disease: Distribution of Legionella pneumophila Serogroups and Monoclonal Subgroups

  •  J. Helbig
  •  S. Bernander
  •  M. Castellani Pastoris
  •  J. Etienne
  •  V. Gaia
  •  S. Lauwers
  •  D. Lindsay
  •  P. Lück
  •  T. Marques
  •  S. Mentula
  •  M. Peeters
  •  C. Pelaz
  •  M. Struelens
  •  S. Uldum
  •  G. Wewalka
  •  T. Harrison
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Abstract.

This pan-European study included unrelated strains of Legionella pneumophila obtained from 1,335 cases of Legionnaires' disease. The isolates were serotyped into the serogroups 1 to 15 by monoclonal antibodies (MAb) and/or rabbit antisera. Additionally, MAb subgrouping was undertaken for isolates belonging to serogroups 1, 4, and 5. Monoclonal types of serogroup 1 were subdivided as having, or not having, the virulence-associated epitope recognized by the MAb 3/1 (Dresden Panel). This epitope is not present on strains belonging to any other serogroups. Taking all Legionella incidents together, MAb 3/1-positive cases were most frequent (66.8%); 11.7% of the isolates belonged to MAb 3/1-negative serogroup 1 subgroups and 21.5% to other serogroups, with serogroups 3 and 6 predominating. Among all serotypes discriminated in this study, monoclonal subtype Philadelphia was the most frequent. If categories of infection were considered, the proportion of MAb 3/1-negative strains differed significantly (P<0.0005) between community-acquired cases (139/510; 27.3%) and travel-associated (42/295; 14.2%) or hospital-acquired infections (176/329; 53.5%). Moreover, taking distribution in different European areas into account, the proportion of MAb 3/1-negative strains was significantly higher in the Scandinavian region than in the Mediterranean countries or the UK for both community-acquired (48.7% vs. 18.6% or 12.0%; P<0.0005) and nosocomial cases (87.7% vs. 32.6% or 52.6%; P≤0.0007).

Keywords

Monoclonal Antibody Mediterranean Country Rabbit Antiserum European Area Unrelated Strain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  •  J. Helbig
    • 1
  •  S. Bernander
    • 2
  •  M. Castellani Pastoris
    • 3
  •  J. Etienne
    • 4
  •  V. Gaia
    • 5
  •  S. Lauwers
    • 6
  •  D. Lindsay
    • 7
  •  P. Lück
    • 1
  •  T. Marques
    • 8
  •  S. Mentula
    • 9
  •  M. Peeters
    • 10
  •  C. Pelaz
    • 11
  •  M. Struelens
    • 12
  •  S. Uldum
    • 13
  •  G. Wewalka
    • 14
  •  T. Harrison
    • 15
  1. 1.Institut Medizinische Mikrobiologie und Hygiene, Medizinische Fakultät TU Dresden, Fetscherstrasse 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany
  2. 2.Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden
  3. 3.Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy
  4. 4.Hopital Edouard Herriot, Lyon, France
  5. 5.Istituto Cantonale Batteriologico, Lugano, Switzerland
  6. 6.Academisch Ziekenhuis, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium
  7. 7.Scottish Legionella Reference Laboratory, Glasgow, UK
  8. 8.Santa Cruz Hospital, Carnaxide, Portugal
  9. 9.National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland
  10. 10.Streeklaboratorium Volksgezondheid, Tilburg, The Netherlands
  11. 11.Centro National Microbiologia, Madrid, Spain
  12. 12.Erasme Hospital, University Brussels, Brussels, Belgium
  13. 13.Statens Seruminstitut, Copenhagen, Denmark
  14. 14.Bundesstaatliche Bakteriologisch-Serologische Untersuchungsanstalt, Vienna, Austria
  15. 15.PHLS Central Public Health Laboratory, London, UK

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