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Journal of Wood Science

, Volume 64, Issue 5, pp 509–514 | Cite as

Effects of density and anatomical feature on mechanical properties of various wood species in lateral tension

  • Yuka MiyoshiEmail author
  • Keisuke Kojiro
  • Yuzo Furuta
Original Article

Abstract

This study is focused on what factor mainly affects the mechanical properties of each wood species in the lateral direction. At first, the influence of the density which is closely related to mechanical properties in the longitudinal direction was also researched in the lateral direction. Thus, the elastic modulus, strength, and failure strain in the lateral tension were measured using thin cross-sectional samples of softwoods and hardwoods, having wide varieties in the density and anatomical features. The results obtained are as follows. The linear relationship between the density and the elastic modulus which has been verified in the longitudinal direction was not observed in the lateral tension for the samples with the annual ring inclination of 90°, which samples were influenced by ray arranged parallel to the tensile direction. However, samples with the annual ring inclination of 45° showed the high correlation between the density and the elastic modulus due to the shearing deformation of the cell shape. On the other hand, the proportional relationship between the elastic modulus and strength which has been verified in the longitudinal direction was not observed in the lateral tension except for the samples with the annual ring inclination of 90°. From the results obtained, it was revealed that the mechanical properties of wood in the lateral direction were significantly affected not only by the density but also by the structural features such as deformation of cell shapes, arrangement of ray or vessels, and the degree of the transition from the earlywood to the latewood.

Keywords

Lateral tension Density Anatomical feature Cell deformation Annual ring 

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Copyright information

© The Japan Wood Research Society 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Forestry and Forest Products Research InstituteTsukubaJapan
  2. 2.Division of Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Life and Environmental SciencesKyoto Prefectural UniversityKyotoJapan

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