The rise of soluble platelet-derived growth factor receptor β in CSF early after subarachnoid hemorrhage correlates with cerebral vasospasm

  • Jing-peng Liu
  • Zhen-nan Ye
  • Sheng-yin Lv
  • Zong Zhuang
  • Xiang-sheng Zhang
  • Xin Zhang
  • Wei Wu
  • Lei Mao
  • Yue Lu
  • Ling-yun Wu
  • Jie-mei Fan
  • Wen-ju Tian
  • Chun-hua Hang
Original Article
  • 28 Downloads

Abstract

Platelet-derived growth factor β (PDGFβ) has been proposed to contribute to the development of cerebral vasospasm (CVS) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and soluble PDGFRβ (sPDGFRβ) is considered to be an inhibitor of PDGF signaling. We aimed at determining the sPDGFRβ concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with aneurysmal SAH (aSAH) and analyzing the relationship between sPDGFRβ level and CVS. CSF was sampled from 32 patients who suffered aSAH and five normal controls. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was performed to determine the sPDGFRβ concentrations in the CSF. Functional outcome was assessed using modified Rankin scale (mRS) at 6 months after aSAH. CVS was identified using transcranial Doppler or angio-CT or DSA. The cutoff of sPDGFRβ for CVS was defined on the ROC curve. The concentrations of sPDGFRβ following aSAH were both higher than those of normal controls on days 1–3 and 4–6, and peaked on days 7–9 post-SAH. The cutoff value of sPDGFRβ level on days 1–3 for CVS was defined as 975.38 pg/ml according to the ROC curve (AUC = 0.680, p = 0.082). In addition, CSF sPDGFRβ concentrations correlated with CVS (r = 0.416, p = 0.018), and multivariate analysis indicated that sPDGFRβ level higher than 975.38 pg/ml on days 1–3 was an independent predictor of CVS (p = 0.001, OR = 19.22, 95% CI: 3.27–113.03), but not for unfavorable outcome after aSAH in the current study. CSF sPDGFRβ level increases after aSAH and is higher in patients who developed CVS, and sPDGFRβ level higher than 975.38 pg/ml on days 1–3 is a potential predictor for CVS after SAH.

Keywords

Cerebrospinal fluid Soluble platelet-derived growth factor receptor β Cerebral vasospasm Subarachnoid hemorrhage 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia S.r.l., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jing-peng Liu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zhen-nan Ye
    • 3
    • 2
  • Sheng-yin Lv
    • 2
  • Zong Zhuang
    • 2
  • Xiang-sheng Zhang
    • 4
  • Xin Zhang
    • 2
  • Wei Wu
    • 2
  • Lei Mao
    • 2
  • Yue Lu
    • 4
  • Ling-yun Wu
    • 4
  • Jie-mei Fan
    • 2
  • Wen-ju Tian
    • 2
  • Chun-hua Hang
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Neurosurgery, Xinqiao HospitalThird Military Medical UniversityChongqingPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Department of Neurosurgery, Jinling Hospital, School of MedicineSouthern Medical University (Guangzhou)NanjingPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Department of NeurosurgeryThe Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical UniversityGuangzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  4. 4.Department of Neurosurgery, Jinling Hospital, School of MedicineNanjing UniversityNanjingPeople’s Republic of China

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