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Neurological Sciences

, Volume 36, Issue 11, pp 2043–2051 | Cite as

Mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion: five cases and a literature review

  • Jing Jing Pan
  • You-yan Zhao
  • Chao Lu
  • Yu-hua HuEmail author
  • Yang YangEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

The aim of this study was to explore the clinical characteristics and etiology of mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion (MERS) in China by retrospectively analyzing five MERS cases from the Jiangsu Provincial Hospital within a total of 27 reported MERS cases from available Chinese literature. Most of the 27 cases originated near the eastern and southern parts of China. Ages for 23 MERS cases were under 30 years and the female-to-male ratio was 1:1.25. The major causes of MERS included infection, antiepileptic drug withdrawal, high-altitude cerebral edema, and cesarean section (C-section). Hyponatremia was also observed in 10 MERS cases. All patients had a complete recovery within a month. Steroids and IVIG were the most commonly used therapy for MERS, but their efficiency remained questionable.

Keywords

Mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion (MERS) Hyponatremia MRI Splenium of the corpus callosum 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported with Scientific research project of Jiangsu Provincial Health Department, Key subjects of maternal and child health in Jiangsu Province, FXK201212.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no financial or other conflicts of interest in relation to this research and its publication.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Pediatrics, The First Affiliated HospitalNanjing Medical UniversityNanjingChina
  2. 2.Department of Neonatology, Nanjing Children’s HospitalNanjing Medical UniversityNanjingChina

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