Neurological Sciences

, Volume 35, Issue 7, pp 1053–1058 | Cite as

Quality of life in patients with craniocervical dystonia: Italian validation of the “Cervical Dystonia Impact Profile (CDIP-58)” and the “Craniocervical Dystonia Questionnaire (CDQ-24)”

  • Margherita Fabbri
  • Maria Superbo
  • Giovanni Defazio
  • Cesa Lorella Maria Scaglione
  • Elena Antelmi
  • Giacomo Basini
  • Stefania Nassetti
  • Fabio Pizza
  • Rosaria Plasmati
  • Rocco Liguori
Original Article

Abstract

Dystonia is a disabling and disfiguring disorder that can often affect many aspects of patients’ daily lives, and lower their self-esteem. To date, quality of life (QoL) has been assessed in dystonic patients using generic measures that do not address the specific problems of this diagnostic group. Recently, two disease-specific scales “The Cervical Dystonia Impact Profile (CDIP-58)” and the “Craniocervical Dystonia Questionnaire (CDQ-24)” were validated for measuring QoL in craniocervical dystonia patients. No disease-specific scales for QoL for dystonic patients are currently available in Italian. The aim of our study was to produce and validate the Italian version of the CDIP-58 and CDQ-24. We obtained the Italian version of CDQ-24 and CDIP-58 with a back-translation design. Both scales were applied to a population of 94 craniocervical dystonia patients along with the Short Form 36 health-survey questionnaire (SF-36), both before and 4 weeks after botulinum toxin therapy. A group of 65 controls matched for sex, age and comorbidity underwent the SF-36. Internal consistency was satisfactory for all subscales. Both the CDIP-58 and CDQ-24 showed moderate to high correlations with similar items of the SF-36. Sensitivity to change was confirmed by highly significant improvements in all CDQ-24 subscales and by moderate improvements in three out of eight CDIP-58 subscales and total score. This is the first Italian study on QoL in dystonia patients. We validated the Italian version of two disease-specific questionnaires to evaluate QoL in craniocervical dystonia patients. These scales could be useful for both clinical practice and clinical trials.

Keywords

Quality of life CDQ-24 CDIP-58 Craniocervical dystonia 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors thank the people with craniocervical dystonia who participated in this study. They also thank Alessandra Laffi for the technical support and the medical writer Anne Prudence Collins for assistance editing the manuscript.

Supplementary material

10072_2014_1642_MOESM1_ESM.doc (57 kb)
Table S1. Correlation coefficients. Correlation coefficient results between the SF-36 items and the CDIP-58 and CDQ-24 items. Asterisks * indicates significant statistical correlations. The single items of each scale are indicated in Arabic numbers (DOC 57 kb)
10072_2014_1642_MOESM2_ESM.doc (78 kb)
Appendix 1. CDIP-58 (I). Supplementary material 2 (DOC 78 kb)
10072_2014_1642_MOESM3_ESM.doc (28 kb)
Appendix 2. CDQ-24 (I) Supplementary material 3 (DOC 27 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Margherita Fabbri
    • 1
    • 2
  • Maria Superbo
    • 3
  • Giovanni Defazio
    • 3
  • Cesa Lorella Maria Scaglione
    • 1
  • Elena Antelmi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Giacomo Basini
    • 1
  • Stefania Nassetti
    • 1
  • Fabio Pizza
    • 1
    • 2
  • Rosaria Plasmati
    • 1
  • Rocco Liguori
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.IRCCS Institute of Neurological SciencesBolognaItaly
  2. 2.Department of Biomedical and NeuroMotor Sciences (DIBINEM), Alma Mater StudiorumUniversity of BolognaBolognaItaly
  3. 3.Department of Neuroscience and Sensory Organs‘Aldo Moro’ University of BariBari 2Italy

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