Advertisement

“My sister’s hand is in my bed”: a case of somatoparaphrenia

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

Access options

Buy single article

Instant unlimited access to the full article PDF.

US$ 39.95

Price includes VAT for USA

Subscribe to journal

Immediate online access to all issues from 2019. Subscription will auto renew annually.

US$ 99

This is the net price. Taxes to be calculated in checkout.

Fig. 1
Fig. 2

References

  1. 1.

    Gerstmann J (1942) Problem of imperception of disease and of impaired body territories with organic lesions: relation to body scheme and its disorders. Arch Neurol Psychiatr 48:890–913

  2. 2.

    Vallar G, Ronchi R (2009) Somatoparaphrenia: a body delusion. a review of the neuropsychological literature. Exp Brain Res 192:533–551

  3. 3.

    Bisiach E, Vallar G, Perani D, Papagno C, Berti A (1986) Unawareness of disease following lesions of the right hemisphere: anosognosia for hemiplegia and anosognosia for hemianopia. Neuropsychologia 24:471–482

  4. 4.

    Bottini G, Bisiach E, Sterzi R, Vallar G (2002) Feeling touches in someone else’s hand. Neuroreport 13:249–252

  5. 5.

    Halligan PW, Marshall JC, Wade DT (1995) Unilateral somatoparaphrenia after right hemisphere stroke: a case description. Cortex 31:173–182

  6. 6.

    Gandola, Invernizzi, Sedda, Ferrè, Sterzi, Sberna, Paulesu and Bottini (2011) An anatomical account of somatoparaphrenia. Cortex. doi:10.1016/j.cortex.2011.06.012

Download references

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by Italian Ministry of University and Research (MIUR) (M.P., M.A.M., P.P, and P.N.) and Oxford NIHR Biomedical Research Centre (G.Z.)

Conflict of interest

The authors report no conflicts of interest.

Author information

Correspondence to Giovanna Zamboni.

Electronic supplementary material

Supplementary Video. Video recording in Italian language with English subtitles. The video shows an examiner (E) interviewing the patients (P) four days after admission. The patient recognized her left hand as her own and she reported that her sister’s hand was previously in her bed, but then had been moved to her bed side-table by the nurses earlier in the morning. She continued to say that her sister’s hand was somewhere in the room, indicating the bedside table and other pieces of furniture.(MOV 3355 kb)

Supplementary Video. Video recording in Italian language with English subtitles. The video shows an examiner (E) interviewing the patients (P) four days after admission. The patient recognized her left hand as her own and she reported that her sister’s hand was previously in her bed, but then had been moved to her bed side-table by the nurses earlier in the morning. She continued to say that her sister’s hand was somewhere in the room, indicating the bedside table and other pieces of furniture.(MOV 3355 kb)

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Pugnaghi, M., Molinari, M., Panzetti, P. et al. “My sister’s hand is in my bed”: a case of somatoparaphrenia. Neurol Sci 33, 1205–1207 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10072-011-0874-z

Download citation

Keywords

  • Line Bisection
  • Spatial Neglect
  • Anosognosia
  • Body Ownership
  • Delusional Belief