Neurological Sciences

, Volume 30, Issue 3, pp 193–199 | Cite as

Long-term results of immunomodulatory treatment in children and adolescents with multiple sclerosis: the Italian experience

  • Angelo Ghezzi
  • Maria Pia Amato
  • Pietro Annovazzi
  • Marco Capobianco
  • Paolo Gallo
  • Loredana La Mantia
  • Maria Giovanna Marrosu
  • Vittorio Martinelli
  • Nicoletta Milani
  • Lucia Moiola
  • Francesco Patti
  • Carlo Pozzilli
  • Maria Trojano
  • Mauro Zaffaroni
  • Giancarlo Comi
  • The ITEMS (Immunomodulatory Treatment of Early-onset MS) Group
Original Article

Abstract

The main objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of immunomodulatory agents (IMAs) (Interferon-Beta, Glatiramer Acetate) in a large cohort of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with disease onset in childhood or adolescence, treated before 16 years of age, after a long-term follow-up. A total of 130 patients were identified, 77 were treated with Avonex, 39 with Rebif/Betaferon, 14 with Copaxone. After a mean (SD) treatment duration of 53.6 ± 27.0, 59.9 ± 39.5 and 74.6 ± 35.5 months, respectively, the relapse rate decreased significantly. The final EDSS score was unchanged with respect to the initial score. Similar results were also observed in subjects who continued a long-term follow-up after they were included in an observational study in 2004, and in subjects who were treated before 12 years of age. The frequency of clinical and laboratory adverse events was similar to that observed in adult patients. To conclude, IMAs were effective and well tolerated in paediatric patients with MS.

Keywords

Multiple sclerosis Childhood Adolescence Paediatric multiple sclerosis Immunomodulatory agents Interferon-beta Glatiramer acetate 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Angelo Ghezzi
    • 1
  • Maria Pia Amato
    • 2
  • Pietro Annovazzi
    • 1
  • Marco Capobianco
    • 3
  • Paolo Gallo
    • 4
  • Loredana La Mantia
    • 5
  • Maria Giovanna Marrosu
    • 6
  • Vittorio Martinelli
    • 7
  • Nicoletta Milani
    • 8
  • Lucia Moiola
    • 7
  • Francesco Patti
    • 9
  • Carlo Pozzilli
    • 10
  • Maria Trojano
    • 11
  • Mauro Zaffaroni
    • 1
  • Giancarlo Comi
    • 7
  • The ITEMS (Immunomodulatory Treatment of Early-onset MS) Group
  1. 1.Centro Studi Sclerosi Multipla, Ospedale di GallarateGallarateItaly
  2. 2.Dipartimento di NeurologiaUniversità di FirenzeFlorenceItaly
  3. 3.Centro di Riferimento Regionale Sclerosi MultiplaOrbassanoItaly
  4. 4.Centro di Riferimento Regionale per la Sclerosi Multipla, Azienda OspedaleUniversità degli Studi di PadovaPaduaItaly
  5. 5.Centro Sclerosi MultiplaFondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico C. BestaMilanItaly
  6. 6.Centro Sclerosi Multipla e Clinica NeurologicaUniversità di CagliariCagliariItaly
  7. 7.Dipartimento di NeurologiaIstituto Scientifico ed UniversitàMilanItaly
  8. 8.Neuropsichiatria InfantileIstituto Neurologico C. BestaMilanItaly
  9. 9.U.O. Sclerosi Multipla e Malattie Degenerative del SNC, Università di CataniaCataniaItaly
  10. 10.Clinica Neurologica, Ospedale S. AndreaUniversità di RomaRomeItaly
  11. 11.Dipartimento di Scienze Neurologiche e PsichiatricheUniversità di BariBariItaly

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