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Neurological Sciences

, 30:1 | Cite as

The assessment of beta amyloid, tau protein and cystatin C in the cerebrospinal fluid: laboratory markers of neurodegenerative diseases

  • Jan MaresEmail author
  • P. Kanovsky
  • R. Herzig
  • D. Stejskal
  • J. Vavrouskova
  • P. Hlustik
  • H. Vranova
  • S. Burval
  • J. Zapletalova
  • V. Pidrman
  • R. Obereigneru
  • A. Suchy
  • J. Vesely
  • J. Podivinsky
  • K. Urbanek
Original Article

Abstract

To assess the role of tau protein, beta-amyloid(1–42) and cystatin C in the diagnostics of Alzheimer dementia (AD) and other neurodegenerative diseases (ND) by comparing to the control groups (CG). The levels of tau protein, beta-amyloid(1–42) and cystatin C were assessed in the set of 69 patients (AD + ND, 33 males, 36 females, aged 22–90, mean 60.5 + 16.1 years), and in a control group of 69 subjects without the affection of the central nervous system (CGAD + CGND, 33 males, 36 females, aged 20–91, mean 60.5 + 16.0 years). Statistically significant increased tau protein levels (P = 0.0001) and index tau/beta-amyloid(1–42) levels (P = 0.0002) were shown in the group of AD patients, compared to the group of ND patients. One-way ANOVA analysis with Bonferonni post hoc test did not show any significant differences of the cystatin C values between any of the compared groups. ROC analysis showed at least one tie between the positive actual state group (AD) and the negative actual state group (ND) by CSF cystatin C and at least one tie between the positive actual state group and the negative actual state group by CSF tau protein. Our study confirmed previously reported results only in part. While tau protein seems to be quite a reliable marker of AD, the role of beta-amyloid(1–42) and cystatin C in AD diagnosis remains at least questionable.

Keywords

Alzheimer dementia Beta-amyloid(1–42) Cystatin C Tau protein Neurodegenerative diseases 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This project was supported by the IGA MH CR grant number NF7480—3/2003.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jan Mares
    • 1
    • 9
    Email author
  • P. Kanovsky
    • 1
  • R. Herzig
    • 1
  • D. Stejskal
    • 2
  • J. Vavrouskova
    • 2
  • P. Hlustik
    • 1
  • H. Vranova
    • 1
  • S. Burval
    • 3
  • J. Zapletalova
    • 4
  • V. Pidrman
    • 5
  • R. Obereigneru
    • 6
  • A. Suchy
    • 6
  • J. Vesely
    • 7
  • J. Podivinsky
    • 8
  • K. Urbanek
    • 1
  1. 1.Clinic of NeurologyUniversity HospitalOlomoucCzech Republic
  2. 2.Hospital SternberkSternberkCzech Republic
  3. 3.Clinic of RadiologyUniversity HospitalOlomoucCzech Republic
  4. 4.Department of BiometricsPalacky University Medical SchoolOlomoucCzech Republic
  5. 5.Clinic of PsychiatryUniversity HospitalOlomoucCzech Republic
  6. 6.Clinic of PsychologyUniversity HospitalOlomoucCzech Republic
  7. 7.Department of PatophysiologyPalacky University Medical SchoolOlomoucCzech Republic
  8. 8.Neurology Geriatric Medical InstitutionMoravský BerounCzech Republic
  9. 9.Department of NeurologyUniversity HospitalOlomoucCzech Republic

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