Animal Cognition

, Volume 18, Issue 4, pp 885–894

Nest and food search behaviour in desert ants, Cataglyphis: a critical comparison

  • Sarah E. Pfeffer
  • Siegfried Bolek
  • Harald Wolf
  • Matthias Wittlinger
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10071-015-0858-0

Cite this article as:
Pfeffer, S.E., Bolek, S., Wolf, H. et al. Anim Cogn (2015) 18: 885. doi:10.1007/s10071-015-0858-0

Abstract

North African desert ants, Cataglyphis, use path integration to calculate a home vector during their foraging trips, constantly informing them about their position relative to the nest. This home vector is also used to find the way back to a productive feeding site the ant has encountered and thus memorized. When the animal fails to arrive at its goal after having run off the home or food vector, a systematic search is initiated. The basic search strategies are identical for nest and food searches, consisting of a search spiral superimposed by a random walk. While nest searches have been investigated in much detail, food site searches have received comparatively little attention. Here, we quantify and compare nest and food site searches recorded under similar conditions, particularly constant nest–feeder distance, and we observe notable differences in nest and food search performances. The parameters of nest searches are relatively constant and improve little with experience, although those small improvements had not been recognized previously. Food searches, by contrast, are more flexible and cover smaller or larger areas, mainly depending on the reliability of food encounter over several visits. Intriguingly, food site searches may be significantly more focussed than nest searches, although the nest should be the most important goal in an ant’s life. These results demonstrate both adaptability and high accuracy of the ants’ search programme.

Keywords

Desert ant Cataglyphis Navigation Systematic search Food search Nest search 

Supplementary material

10071_2015_858_MOESM1_ESM.docx (505 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 504 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sarah E. Pfeffer
    • 1
    • 2
  • Siegfried Bolek
    • 1
  • Harald Wolf
    • 1
  • Matthias Wittlinger
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of NeurobiologyUniversity of UlmUlmGermany
  2. 2.Institute of NeurobiologyUniversity of UlmUlmGermany

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