Animal Cognition

, Volume 15, Issue 2, pp 285–291

Long-term memory of color stimuli in the jungle crow (Corvus macrorhynchos)

  • Bezawork Afework Bogale
  • Satoshi Sugawara
  • Katsuhisa Sakano
  • Sonoko Tsuda
  • Shoei Sugita
Short Communication

Abstract

Wild-caught jungle crows (n = 20) were trained to discriminate between color stimuli in a two-alternative discrimination task. Next, crows were tested for long-term memory after 1-, 2-, 3-, 6-, and 10-month retention intervals. This preliminary study showed that jungle crows learn the task and reach a discrimination criterion (80% or more correct choices in two consecutive sessions of ten trials) in a few trials, and some even in a single session. Most, if not all, crows successfully remembered the constantly reinforced visual stimulus during training after all retention intervals. These results suggest that jungle crows have a high retention capacity for learned information, at least after a 10-month retention interval and make no or very few errors. This study is the first to show long-term memory capacity of color stimuli in corvids following a brief training that memory rather than rehearsal was apparent. Memory of visual color information is vital for exploitation of biological resources in crows. We suspect that jungle crows could remember the learned color discrimination task even after a much longer retention interval.

Keywords

Color stimuli Discrimination learning Jungle crow (Corvus macrorhynchosLong-term memory 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bezawork Afework Bogale
    • 1
    • 2
  • Satoshi Sugawara
    • 2
  • Katsuhisa Sakano
    • 3
  • Sonoko Tsuda
    • 3
  • Shoei Sugita
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.United Graduate School of Agricultural ScienceTokyo Graduate School of Agriculture and TechnologyTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Laboratory of Function and MorphologyUtsunomiya UniversityUtsunomiya, TochigiJapan
  3. 3.Biotechnology Group, Energy Applications R&D CenterChubu Electric Power Co., Inc.NagoyaJapan

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