Animal Cognition

, Volume 5, Issue 3, pp 187–189 | Cite as

Cecilia Heyes and Ludwig Huber (eds): The Evolution of Cognition MIT Press, 2000, 396 pp, hardcover, ISBN 0-262-08286-1, US$ 52

Book Review

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References

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  2. Bolles RC, Beecher MD (1988). Evolution and learning. Lawrence Erlbaum, LondonGoogle Scholar
  3. Heyes CM (1998) Theory of mind in nonhuman primates. Behav Brain Sci 21:101–134PubMedGoogle Scholar
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  6. Miklósi á, Polgárdi R, Topál J, Csányi V (2000) Intentional behaviour in dog-human communication: an experimental analysis of 'showing’ behaviour in the dog. Anim Cogn 3:159–166CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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  10. Tinbergen N (1963) On aims and methods of ethology. Z Tierpsychol 20:410–433CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of EcologyUniversity of EötvösBudapestHungary

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