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Food Science and Biotechnology

, Volume 28, Issue 6, pp 1759–1767 | Cite as

Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of an ethanol fraction from the Schisandra chinensis baillon hot water extract fermented using Lactobacilius paracasei subsp. tolerans

  • Jung Yoon Yang
  • Geum Ran Kim
  • Jin Sil Chae
  • Hyemin Kan
  • Seong Soon Kim
  • Kyu-Seok Hwang
  • Byung Hoi Lee
  • Sangcheol Yu
  • Seongcheol Moon
  • Byounghee Park
  • Myung Ae BaeEmail author
  • Dae-Seop ShinEmail author
Article
  • 151 Downloads

Abstract

Waste management is a major part of the food industry. The present study was designed to utilize the discarded byproduct of Schisandra chinensis Baillon. The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of a 30% ethanol fraction (RPG-OM-30E) from the fermented hot water extraction of the Schisandra chinensis Baillon byproduct were investigated using RAW 264.7 cells and zebrafish larvae. RPG-OM-30E reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide production in the RAW 264.7 cells. Additionally, RPG-OM-30E inhibited mRNA expression and protein secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-6 (Il-6) and interleukin-1β (Il-). The anti-inflammatory effects of RPG-OM-30E were tested in Tg(mpx::EGFP)i114 zebrafish larvae. Neutrophil migration to a wound site was decreased by RPG-OM-30E. Neutrophil aggregation was also inhibited by RPG-OM-30E after induction of an LPS-induced immune response in the yolk. Finally, the antioxidant and hepatoprotective effects of RPG-OM-30E were examined in vivo. Mice with induced oxidative damage recovered from the stress following RPG-OM-30E treatment.

Keywords

Schisandra chinensis Baillon Antioxidant Anti-inflammatory Zebrafish RAW 264.7 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research was supported by a grant from the Ministry of SMEs & Startups (S2374332) and the Ministry of Trade, Industry & Energy (2019-10063396), Republic of Korea.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© The Korean Society of Food Science and Technology 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jung Yoon Yang
    • 1
  • Geum Ran Kim
    • 1
  • Jin Sil Chae
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hyemin Kan
    • 1
  • Seong Soon Kim
    • 1
  • Kyu-Seok Hwang
    • 1
  • Byung Hoi Lee
    • 1
  • Sangcheol Yu
    • 3
  • Seongcheol Moon
    • 3
  • Byounghee Park
    • 3
  • Myung Ae Bae
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Dae-Seop Shin
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Bio Platform Technology Research CenterKorea Research Institute of Chemical TechnologyDaejeonSouth Korea
  2. 2.Department of Medicinal Chemistry and PharmacologyUniversity of Science & TechnologyDaejeonSouth Korea
  3. 3.R&D Center, Raphagen Inc.SeoulSouth Korea

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