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Daily intake of polyamine-rich Saccharomyces cerevisiae S631 prevents osteoclastic activation and bone loss in ovariectomized mice

  • Takanori Yamada
  • Gyujin Park
  • Junichi Node
  • Kakeru Ozaki
  • Manami Hiraiwa
  • Yuka Kitaguchi
  • Katsuyuki Kaneda
  • Shigeru Hiramoto
  • Eiichi HinoiEmail author
Article
  • 14 Downloads

Abstract

An imbalance in the sophisticated regulation between bone-resorbing osteoclasts and bone-forming osteoblasts leads to the pathogenesis and etiology of certain metabolic bone diseases including osteoporosis. Certain polyamines are related to the pathophysiology of some disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease, infectious disease, cancer, and aging. Recently, we demonstrated that oral intake of polyamines (spermidine and spermine) prevented bone loss through preferential disturbance of osteoclastic activation in ovariectomy-induced mouse model of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Here, we showed that daily oral supplementation of a diet containing polyamine-rich Saccharomyces cerevisiae S631 significantly inhibited osteoclastic activation as well as reduction of bone volume in the cancellous bone without affecting uterine weight in ovariectomized mice. Our findings recommend that daily oral supplementation with polyamine-rich yeast diet would be beneficial for prophylaxis of metabolic bone diseases associated with abnormal osteoclast activation.

Keywords

Spermine Spermidine Bone loss Saccharomyces cerevisiae 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported in part by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (17KT0051 to E.H.).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

Junichi Node and Shigeru Hiramoto are employees of Nisshin Pharma Inc. All other authors state that they have no conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© The Korean Society of Food Science and Technology 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takanori Yamada
    • 1
  • Gyujin Park
    • 1
  • Junichi Node
    • 2
  • Kakeru Ozaki
    • 1
  • Manami Hiraiwa
    • 1
  • Yuka Kitaguchi
    • 1
  • Katsuyuki Kaneda
    • 1
  • Shigeru Hiramoto
    • 2
  • Eiichi Hinoi
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology, Division of Pharmaceutical SciencesKanazawa University Graduate School of Natural Science and TechnologyKanazawaJapan
  2. 2.Health Care Research CenterNisshin Pharma IncFujimino-CityJapan

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