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Food Science and Biotechnology

, Volume 27, Issue 6, pp 1685–1689 | Cite as

Migration study of caprolactam from polyamide 6 sheets into food simulants

  • Hyun Ju Song
  • Yoonjee Chang
  • Ji Sou Lyu
  • Mi Yong Yon
  • Haeng-shin Lee
  • Se-Jong Park
  • Jae Chun Choi
  • MeeKyung Kim
  • Jaejoon HanEmail author
Article
  • 165 Downloads

Abstract

Caprolactam, used in manufacturing polyamide (PA) 6, may threaten human health. Here, PA 6 sheets were produced by using a twin-screw extruder to evaluate its safety. Caprolactam migration concentrations from the PA 6 sheets into food simulants were evaluated according to the standard migration test conditions under the Korean Food Standards Codex (KFSC). Concentrations were investigated under various food simulants (distilled water, 4% acetic acid, 20 and 50% ethanol, and heptane) and storage conditions (at 25, 60, and 95 °C). Caprolactam migration concentrations into food simulants were determined as follows: 4% acetic acid (0.982 mg/L), distilled water (0.851 mg/L), 50% ethanol (0.624 mg/L), 20% ethanol (0.328 mg/L), and n-heptane (not detected). Migrations were determined to be under the regulatory concentration (15 mg/L) according to the KFSC test conditions. Taken together, these results verified that the standard migration test conditions by KFSC were reliable to evaluate the safety of PA 6.

Keywords

Polyamide 6 Caprolactam Migration Food contact material Korean Food Standards Codex regulation 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research was supported by a Grant 15162MFDS043 from Ministry of Food and Drug Safety in 2015–2017 and also supported by a Basic Science Research Program of National Research Foundation (NRF) of Korea, funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2017R1D1A1B03029743).

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Copyright information

© The Korean Society of Food Science and Technology and Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hyun Ju Song
    • 1
  • Yoonjee Chang
    • 2
  • Ji Sou Lyu
    • 1
  • Mi Yong Yon
    • 3
  • Haeng-shin Lee
    • 3
  • Se-Jong Park
    • 4
  • Jae Chun Choi
    • 4
  • MeeKyung Kim
    • 4
  • Jaejoon Han
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences and BiotechnologyKorea UniversitySeoulRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Department of Food Bioscience and Technology, College of Life Sciences and BiotechnologyKorea UniversitySeoulRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.Nutrition Policy and Promotion TeamKorean Health Industry Development InstituteOsongRepublic of Korea
  4. 4.Food Additives and Packaging Division, National Institute of Food and Drug Safety EvaluationMinistry of Food and Drug SafetyOsongRepublic of Korea

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