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Food Science and Biotechnology

, Volume 21, Issue 1, pp 295–298 | Cite as

Food authenticity using natural carbon isotopes (12C, 13C, 14C) in grass-fed and grain-fed beef

  • Seung-Hyun Kim
  • Gustavo D. Cruz
  • James G. Fadel
  • Andrew J. CliffordEmail author
Research Note

Abstract

Natural carbon isotopes, 12C, 13C, and 14C, help to authenticate/trace foods and beverages. Levels of total carbon (TC), 13C (δ13C), and 14C in muscle and lipid tissues from grass-fed versus grain-fed steers are reported. The δ13C in muscle versus lipid of steaks were around 5‰ higher in grain over grass-fed (p<0.05). The δ13C and 14C levels were higher in muscle over lipid tissues while the opposite was true for TC (p<0.05). TC content was around 20% higher in lipid over muscle due to different elemental compositions, lipid versus muscle, not carbon isotopes discrimination.

Keywords

carbon isotope food authenticity grass-fed beef grain-fed beef 

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Copyright information

© The Korean Society of Food Science and Technology and Springer Netherlands 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Seung-Hyun Kim
    • 1
    • 3
  • Gustavo D. Cruz
    • 2
  • James G. Fadel
    • 2
  • Andrew J. Clifford
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of NutritionUniversity of California DavisDavisUSA
  2. 2.Department of Animal ScienceUniversity of California DavisDavisUSA
  3. 3.Center for Analytical Chemistry, Division of Metrology for Quality of LifeKorea Research Institute of Standards and ScienceYuseong, DaejeonKorea

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