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Clinical Rheumatology

, Volume 38, Issue 12, pp 3485–3491 | Cite as

Predictor of depressive disorders in patients with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis

  • Jan-Di Yun
  • Junghee Ha
  • Solah Kim
  • Hyung Ah Park
  • Juyoung Yoo
  • Sung Soo Ahn
  • Seung Min Jung
  • Jason Jungsik Song
  • Yong-Beom Park
  • Sang-Won LeeEmail author
Brief Report

Abstract

We investigated the frequency of depressive disorders and determined the predictors of depressive disorders in Korean patients with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis. Sixty-one patients with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)–associated vasculitis (AAV) were enrolled in this study. We assessed the Birmingham vasculitis activity score (BVAS), vasculitis damage index (VDI) and the Korean version of the short form 36-item Health Survey (SF-36). SF-36 consists of the mental component score (MCS) and physical component score (PCS). Depression disorder was identified based on the Korean version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale-Revised (K-CESD-R) ≥ 16. Mood states including depression were assessed by the Korean edition of the Profile of Mood States (K-POMS) subscales. The mean age was 62.2 years (19 men). Twenty-eight AAV patients (45.9%) had depressive disorders based on K-CESD-R ≥ 16. Both SF-36 MCS and SF-36 PCS were negatively correlated with K-CESD-R (r = − 0.687 and r = − 0.594) and K-POMS depression (r = − 0.604 and r = − 0.480), respectively. The optimal cut-offs of SF-36 MCS and SF-36 PCS for depressive disorders based on K-CESD-R ≥ 16 were obtained as 48.07 and 55.63. Patients with SF-36 MCS ≤ 48.07 exhibited a significantly high RR for depressive disorders, compared with those without (RR 42.667). Also, patients with SF-36 PCS ≤ 55.63 showed a significantly high RR depressive disorder, compared with those without (RR 13.619). We demonstrated that SF-36 could help to estimate the current depressive disorders. We also suggest a method to obtain the optimal cut-offs of SF-36 to predict depressive disorders.

Key points

• Both SF-36 MCS and SF-36 PCS were negatively correlated with K-CESD-R and K-POMS depression.

• Patients with SF-36 MCS ≤ 48.07 exhibited a significantly high relative risk (RR) for depressive disorders, compared with those without (RR 42.667).

• Patients with SF-36 PCS ≤ 55.63 showed a significantly high RR depressive disorder, compared with those without (RR 13.619).

Keywords

Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody–associated vasculitis Depression Predictor SF-36 

Notes

Funding information

This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (2017R1D1A1B03029050) and a grant from the Korea Health Technology R&D Project through the Korea Health Industry Development Institute, funded by the Ministry of Health and Welfare, Republic of Korea (HI14C1324).

Compliance with ethical standards

This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of Severance Hospital (4-2016-0901) and the patients’ written informed consent was obtained.

Disclosures

None.

Supplementary material

10067_2019_4657_MOESM1_ESM.docx (22 kb)
ESM 1 (DOCX 22 kb)

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Copyright information

© International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Institute for Immunology and Immunological DiseasesYonsei University College of MedicineSeoulRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryYonsei University College of MedicineSeoulRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.Institute for Immunology and Immunological DiseasesYonsei University College of MedicineSeoulRepublic of Korea

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