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Associations between paraoxonase 1 (PON1) polymorphisms and susceptibility and PON1 activity in rheumatoid arthritis patients, and comparison of PON1 activity in patients and controls: a meta-analysis

  • Sang-Cheol Bae
  • Young Ho LeeEmail author
Original Article
  • 11 Downloads

Abstract

Objectives

We reviewed the associations between paraoxonase 1 (PON1) polymorphisms and susceptibility and PON1 activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and compared PON1 activity between RA patients and controls.

Methods

We conducted a meta-analysis of PON1 Q192R and L55M polymorphism and RA risk data and determined the associations between PON1 Q192R polymorphism and PON1 activity in RA patients. We also compared serum/plasma PON1 activity levels in RA patients and controls.

Results

Twelve studies were included in this meta-analysis. No association was observed between RA and the PON1 192R allele in any study subject (OR = 0.967, 95% CI = 0.829–1.129, p = 0.674). Analysis using recessive, dominant, or homozygous contrast models revealed no association between the PON1 192R allele and RA. Meta-analysis showed no association between RA and the PON1 55M allele (OR = 1.400, 95% CI = 0.738–2.658, p = 0.308). In the meta-analysis, PON1 activity was significantly higher in the RR genotype than in the QQ (SMD = 2.975, 95% CI = 2.157–3.792, p < 0.001) and QR (SMD = 1.265, 95% CI = 0.898–1.633, p < 0.001) genotypes. PON1 activity was significantly lower in the RA group than in the control group (SMD = − 3.176, 95% CI = − 5.070 to − 1.283, p < 0.001).

Conclusions

We found no association between the PON1 Q192R and L55M polymorphisms and susceptibility to RA, while PON1 Q192R polymorphism was associated with PON1 activity in RA patients; we found significantly lower PON1 activity in RA patients.

Key points

PON1 Q192R polymorphism is associated with PON1 activity in RA patients..

PON1 activity is significantly lower in RA patients..

Keywords

Activity Polymorphism PON1 Rheumatoid arthritis 

Notes

Funding information

This study was supported in part by the Bio & Medical Technology Development Program of the National Research Foundation (NRF) and funded by the Ministry of Science & ICT (NRF-2017M3A9B4050335), Republic of Korea.

Compliance with ethical standards

Disclosures

None.

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Copyright information

© International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of RheumatologyHanyang University Hospital for Rheumatic DiseasesSeoulSouth Korea
  2. 2.Department of Rheumatology, Korea University Anam HospitalKorea University College of MedicineSeoulSouth Korea

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