Clinical Rheumatology

, Volume 37, Issue 4, pp 1115–1118 | Cite as

Adults with incident accelerated knee osteoarthritis are more likely to receive a knee replacement: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

  • Julie E. Davis
  • Shao-Hsien Liu
  • Kate Lapane
  • Matthew S. Harkey
  • Lori Lyn Price
  • Bing Lu
  • Grace H. Lo
  • Charles B. Eaton
  • Mary F. Barbe
  • Timothy E. McAlindon
  • Jeffrey B. Driban
Brief Report

Abstract

We aimed to determine if knees with incident accelerated knee osteoarthritis (AKOA) were more likely to receive a knee replacement (KR) than those with common knee osteoarthritis (KOA) or no KOA. We conducted a nested cohort study using data from baseline and the first 9 years of the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI). Eligible knees had no radiographic KOA at baseline (Kellgren-Lawrence [KL] < 2). We classified 3 groups using KL grades from the first 8 years of the OAI: 1) AKOA: knee progressed to advance-stage KOA (KL 3/4) in ≤ 4 years, 2) common KOA: knee increased in KL grade (excluding AKOA), and 3) No KOA: no change in KL grade by 8 years. The outcome was a KR (partial or total) at or before the 9-year OAI visit. We conducted a logistic regression with generalized linear mixed model and adjusted for age, body mass index, and sex. Overall, 14% of knees with AKOA received a KR by the 9th year compared with 1% and < 1% of those with common or no KOA, respectively. Knees that developed AKOA were > 80x and ~ 25x more likely to receive a KR than knees with no KOA or incident common KOA (adjusted odds ratio = 25.08; 95% confidence interval = 9.63-65.34). In conclusion, approximately 1 in 7 knees that develop AKOA received a KR; however, KRs were rare in the OAI among other knees with no radiographic KOA at baseline. Urgent steps are needed to identify adults at high-risk for AKOA and develop prevention strategies regarding the modifiable risk factors.

Notes

Acknowledgements

The OAI is a public-private partnership comprised of five contracts (N01-AR-2-2258; N01-AR-2-2259; N01-AR-2-2260; N01-AR-2-2261; N01-AR-2-2262) funded by the National Institutes of Health, a branch of the Department of Health and Human Services, and conducted by the OAI Study Investigators. Private funding partners include Merck Research Laboratories; Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation; GlaxoSmithKline; and Pfizer, Inc. Private sector funding for the OAI is managed by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health.

Compliance with ethical standards

The OAI has been approved and meets all criteria for ethical standards regarding human and animal studies defined in the 1964 Declaration of Helsinki and all amendments made after. Participants provided informed consent prior to participation.

Disclosures

None.

References

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Copyright information

© International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julie E. Davis
    • 1
  • Shao-Hsien Liu
    • 2
  • Kate Lapane
    • 2
  • Matthew S. Harkey
    • 1
  • Lori Lyn Price
    • 3
    • 4
  • Bing Lu
    • 5
  • Grace H. Lo
    • 6
    • 7
  • Charles B. Eaton
    • 8
  • Mary F. Barbe
    • 9
  • Timothy E. McAlindon
    • 1
  • Jeffrey B. Driban
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of RheumatologyTufts Medical CenterBostonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Quantitative Health SciencesUniversity of Massachusetts Medical SchoolWorcesterUSA
  3. 3.The Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy StudiesTufts Medical CenterBostonUSA
  4. 4.Tufts Clinical and Translational Science InstituteTufts UniversityBostonUSA
  5. 5.Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  6. 6.Medical Care Line and Research Care LineHouston Health Services Research and Development (HSR&D) Center of Excellence Michael E. DeBakey VAMCHoustonUSA
  7. 7.Section of Immunology, Allergy, and RheumatologyBaylor College of MedicineHoustonUSA
  8. 8.Center for Primary Care and PreventionAlpert Medical School of Brown UniversityPawtucketUSA
  9. 9.Department of Anatomy and Cell BiologyTemple University School of MedicinePhiladelphiaUSA

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