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Clinical Rheumatology

, Volume 36, Issue 8, pp 1849–1853 | Cite as

Evaluation of the effect of Elaeagnus angustifolia alone and combined with Boswellia thurifera compared with ibuprofen in patients with knee osteoarthritis: a randomized double-blind controlled clinical trial

  • Mansoor Karimifar
  • Rasool SoltaniEmail author
  • Valiollah Hajhashemi
  • Sara Sarrafchi
Original Article

Abstract

Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common articular disorders. Many patients do not respond to acetaminophen and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), the mainstay of pharmacotherapy for knee OA. The plants Elaeagnus angustifolia and Boswellia thurifera have anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of E. angustifolia alone and in combination with B. thurifera compared with ibuprofen in patients with knee osteoarthritis. In a randomized double-blind controlled clinical trial, 75 patients with knee OA were randomly and equally assigned to one of three groups Elaeagnus (n = 23), Elaeagnus/Boswellia (n = 26), and ibuprofen (n = 26) to receive the capsules of Elaeagnus, Elaeagnus/Boswellia, and ibuprofen, respectively, three times daily with meals for 4 weeks. Pain severity based on VAS (visual analog scale, 0 to 10 scale) and the scores of LPFI (Lequesne Pain and Function Index) and PGA (patient global assessment) were determined pre- and post-intervention for all patients. All interventions had significant lowering effects on VAS, LPFI, and PGA scores (P < 0.001 for all parameters) with no significant difference between groups in terms of effects on all evaluated parameters. Consumption of E. angustifolia fruit extract either alone or in combination with Boswellia oleo-gum resin extract could decrease pain and improve function in patients with knee osteoarthritis comparable to ibuprofen.

Keywords

Boswellia thurifera Clinical trial Elaeagnus angustifolia Ibuprofen Knee osteoarthritis 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study was financially supported by Barij Essence Pharmaceutical Company, Kashan, Iran. The authors would like to acknowledge the staff of Barij Essence Company and Rheumatology Clinic of Alzahra Hospital for their assistance.

Compliance with ethical standards

Disclosures

None.

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Copyright information

© International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mansoor Karimifar
    • 1
  • Rasool Soltani
    • 2
    Email author
  • Valiollah Hajhashemi
    • 3
  • Sara Sarrafchi
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Rheumatology, School of MedicineIsfahan University of Medical SciencesIsfahanIran
  2. 2.Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical SciencesIsfahan University of Medical SciencesIsfahanIran
  3. 3.Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical SciencesIsfahan University of Medical SciencesIsfahanIran

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