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Clinical Rheumatology

, Volume 34, Issue 2, pp 321–327 | Cite as

Single center study on ethnic and clinical features of Behcet’s disease in Moscow, Russia

  • Anton Lennikov
  • Zemfira Alekberova
  • Regina Goloeva
  • Nobuyoshi KitaichiEmail author
  • Lev Denisov
  • Kenichi Namba
  • Mitsuhiro Takeno
  • Yoshiaki Ishigatsubo
  • Nobuhisa Mizuki
  • Eugeny Nasonov
  • Susumu Ishida
  • Shigeaki Ohno
Original Article

Abstract

For the purpose of investigating Behcet’s disease (BD) in Russia, 250 consecutive patients (177 men and 73 women) diagnosed with BD between 1990 and 2010 at the Research Institute of Rheumatology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences in Moscow were enrolled in this study. The ethnic backgrounds of the patients were reported as follows: 23.2 % (58 cases) from Russia, 12.8 % (32 cases) from Azerbaijan, 14.4 % (36 cases) from Armenia, 8.8 % (22 cases) from Chechnya, and 21.6 % (55 cases) from Dagestan. The remaining 19.2 % (48 cases) were from other regions or of unknown origin. More than half (57.6 %) of the Behcet’s disease patients originated from Central Asia, specifically Azerbaijan, Armenia, Chechnya, and Dagestan. The mean age at disease onset was 31.5 ± 9.38 (13–60) years old, and the most typical initial manifestations were oral aphthous ulcers. Patients aged 20–39 years old were more commonly affected and displayed a wide clinical spectrum of the disease, with varieties of severe internal organ involvement. The manifestations observed throughout the course of the disease included oral aphthous ulcers (100 %), various cutaneous lesions (88.8 %), genital ulcers (81.2 %), and ocular lesions (54.0 %). Besides these, many organs/systems were implicated in patient cases, namely joint (53.2 %), vascular (25.2 %), neurological (8.0 %), gastrointestinal (25.2 %), and cardiac (5.6 %) systems. Involvements of ocular (p < 0.01) and skin (p < 0.01) lesions were more frequent in men than in women. HLA-B51 and HLA-A26 typing was performed in 127 patients and 508 healthy controls. HLA-B51 was found in 63.0 % of BD patients compared to 20.7 % of the healthy control subjects (p < 0.001), and HLA-A26 was present in 11.3 % of BD patients and 18.9 % of the control group. This study shows the presence of BD in Russia, and it is suggested that its prevalence in Central Asian people is much higher than that in White Russian.

Keywords

Behcet’s disease Caucasus Central Asia Clinical symptoms Russia Silk Road disease 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by grants from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) KAKENHI (grant numbers: 25462731, 23592602, and 22133010) and Russian Academy of Medical Science (RAMS) as part of study on Behcet’s disease in Russia.

Disclosures

None.

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Copyright information

© Clinical Rheumatology 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anton Lennikov
    • 1
    • 3
  • Zemfira Alekberova
    • 2
  • Regina Goloeva
    • 2
  • Nobuyoshi Kitaichi
    • 3
    • 4
    Email author
  • Lev Denisov
    • 2
  • Kenichi Namba
    • 1
  • Mitsuhiro Takeno
    • 5
  • Yoshiaki Ishigatsubo
    • 5
  • Nobuhisa Mizuki
    • 6
  • Eugeny Nasonov
    • 2
  • Susumu Ishida
    • 1
    • 4
  • Shigeaki Ohno
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of OphthalmologyHokkaido University Graduate School of MedicineSapporoJapan
  2. 2.Research Institute of RheumatologyRussian Academy of Medical Sciences (RAMS)MoscowRussia
  3. 3.Department of OphthalmologyHealth Sciences University of HokkaidoSapporoJapan
  4. 4.Department of Ocular Inflammation and ImmunologyHokkaido University Graduate School of MedicineSapporoJapan
  5. 5.Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical ImmunologyYokohama City University Graduate School of MedicineYokohamaJapan
  6. 6.Department of Ophthalmology and Visual ScienceYokohama City University Graduate School of MedicineYokohamaJapan

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