Clinical Rheumatology

, Volume 30, Issue 2, pp 269–273 | Cite as

Increased serum IL-17 and IL-23 in the patient with ankylosing spondylitis

  • Yang Mei
  • Faming Pan
  • Jing Gao
  • Rui Ge
  • Zhenhua Duan
  • Zhen Zeng
  • Fangfang Liao
  • Guo Xia
  • Sheng Wang
  • Shengqian Xu
  • Jianhua Xu
  • Li Zhang
  • Dongqing Ye
Brief Report

Abstract

Interleukin 17 (IL-17) is a Th17 cytokine associated with inflammation, autoimmunity, and defense against some bacteria; it has been implicated in many chronic autoimmune diseases including psoriasis, multiple sclerosis, and systemic sclerosis. However, whether IL-17 plays a role in the pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) remains unclear. To analyze the content of IL-17 and IL-23 in the serum from patients with AS compared with health control subject, 50 patients with AS and 43 healthy volunteers were recruited. Serum IL-17 levels were examined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Statistic analyses were performed by SPSS 13.0. Results show that the serum IL-17 and IL-23 levels were significantly elevated in AS patients as compared with normal controls. Nevertheless, no associations of serum IL-17 and IL-23 levels with clinical and laboratory parameters were found; no significant difference regarding serum IL-17 and IL-23 levels was found between less active AS and more active AS. However, there was a strong positive association between the serum levels of IL-17 and IL-23 in the AS patients. Our results indicate increased serum IL-17 and IL-23 levels in AS patients, suggesting that this two cytokine may play critical roles in the pathogenesis of AS. Therefore, further studies are required to confirm this preliminary data.

Keywords

Ankylosing spondylitis Interleukin 17 Interleukin 23 

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Copyright information

© Clinical Rheumatology 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yang Mei
    • 1
  • Faming Pan
    • 1
  • Jing Gao
    • 1
  • Rui Ge
    • 1
  • Zhenhua Duan
    • 1
  • Zhen Zeng
    • 1
  • Fangfang Liao
    • 1
  • Guo Xia
    • 1
  • Sheng Wang
    • 1
  • Shengqian Xu
    • 2
  • Jianhua Xu
    • 2
  • Li Zhang
    • 3
  • Dongqing Ye
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public HealthAnhui Medical UniversityHefeiChina
  2. 2.Department of Rheumatology, First Affiliated hospitalAnhui Medical UniversityHefeiChina
  3. 3.Anhui Medical Genetics Center in Anhui Medical CollegeHefeiChina

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