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Clinical Rheumatology

, Volume 29, Issue 3, pp 241–246 | Cite as

Anti-agalactosyl IgG antibodies in Thai patients with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and systemic sclerosis

  • Worawit Louthrenoo
  • Nuntana Kasitanon
  • Ramjai Wichainun
  • Suparaporn Wangkaew
  • Waraporn Sukitawut
  • Shoji Kuwata
  • Fujio Takeuchi
Original Article

Abstract

This study was performed to determine the prevalence of anti-agalactosyl IgG antibodies in Thai patients with RA, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and systemic sclerosis (SSc), and determine the sensitivity and specificity of anti-agalactosyl IgG antibodies in the diagnosis of RA in comparison with IgM-rheumatoid factor (IgM-RF) and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibodies. Serum samples were obtained from 100 patients with RA, 50 cases of SLE, 50 cases of SSc, and 100 healthy controls and analyzed for the presence of anti-agalactosyl IgG antibodies, IgM-RF and anti-CCP antibodies. A serum value greater than mean + 2 standard deviation of normal value of anti-agalactosyl IgG antibodies and anti-CCP antibodies was considered positive. The prevalence of anti-agalactosyl IgG antibodies in RA, SLE, and SSc patients was 88.0%, 14.0%, and 12.0%, respectively. The serum level of anti-agalactosyl IgG antibodies in patients with RA (227.10 ± 353.64 AU/mL) was significantly higher than those in SLE (11.84 ± 52.04 AU/mL), SSc (18.85 ± 99.60 AU/mL), and healthy controls (2.14 ± 1.97 AU/mL), (p < 0.001). There was a good correlation between the log serum level of anti-agalactosyl IgG antibodies and IgM-RF (r = 0.92, p < 0.001), anti-CCP antibodies and IgM-RF (r = 0.49, p < 0.001), and anti-agalactosyl IgG antibodies and anti-CCP antibodies (r = 0.55, p < 0.001). The sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of RA was 88.00% and 96.00% for anti-agalactosyl IgG antibodies, 90.00% and 99.00% for anti-CCP antibodies, and 91.00% and 95.00% for IgM-RF, respectively. The serum level of anti-agalactosyl IgG antibodies was significantly higher in RA than in SLE, SSc, and healthy controls. There was a good correlation between serum levels of anti-agalactosyl IgG antibodies, anti-CCP antibodies, and IgM-RF. These three tests had comparable sensitivity and specificity.

Keywords

Anti-agalactosyl IgG antibodies Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies Rheumatoid arthritis Rheumatoid factor Systemic lupus erythematosus Systemic sclerosis 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study was partially supported by a grant from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sport, Science and Technology of Japan, and the Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University Endowment Fund.

Disclosure

Worawit Louthrenoo, M.D.—Received a grant from the Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University.

Nuntana Kasitanon, M.D.—None.

Ramjai Wichainun, B.Sc.—None.

Suparaporn Wangkaew, M.D.—None.

Waraporn Sukitawut, B.Sc.—None.

Shoji Kuwata, M.D.—None.

Fujio Takeuchi, M.D.—Received a grant from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sport, Science and Technology of Japan.

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Copyright information

© Clinical Rheumatology 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Worawit Louthrenoo
    • 1
  • Nuntana Kasitanon
    • 1
  • Ramjai Wichainun
    • 1
  • Suparaporn Wangkaew
    • 1
  • Waraporn Sukitawut
    • 1
  • Shoji Kuwata
    • 2
  • Fujio Takeuchi
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Faculty of MedicineChiang Mai UniversityChiang MaiThailand
  2. 2.Third Department of Internal Medicine, Teikyo University Chiba Medical CenterTeikyo University School of MedicineChibaJapan
  3. 3.Department of Internal Medicine (Allergy and Rheumatology), Faculty of MedicineUniversity of TokyoTokyoJapan

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