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Clinical Rheumatology

, Volume 26, Issue 11, pp 1963–1967 | Cite as

Combination of transverse myelitis and arachnoiditis in cauda equina syndrome of long-standing ankylosing spondylitis: MRI features and its role in clinical management

  • Howard Haw-Chang LanEmail author
  • Der-Yuan Chen
  • Clayton Chi-Chang Chen
  • Joung-Liang Lan
  • Chia-Wei Hsieh
Case Report

Abstract

The cauda equina syndrome (CES) is a rare neurological complication of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Imaging diagnosis of CES in long-standing AS patients (CES-AS) using myelography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were reported in the literature. They, however, demonstrate only the chronic abnormalities of CES-AS, i.e., dural ectasia, dorsal dural diverticula, and selective bone erosion at the posterior elements of the vertebrae. To our knowledge, imaging features of acute intradural inflammation in CES-AS were not described. We report a patient of CES-AS in whom MRI disclosed acute transverse myelitis and arachnoiditis along the lower spinal cord, and discuss the pathogenesis of CES-AS and the role of MRI in clinical management.

Keywords

Ankylosing spondylitis Arachnoiditis Cauda equina syndrome Dural diverticula Magnetic resonance imaging Transverse myelitis 

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Copyright information

© Clinical Rheumatology 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Howard Haw-Chang Lan
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
    • 7
    Email author
  • Der-Yuan Chen
    • 2
    • 5
    • 6
  • Clayton Chi-Chang Chen
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
  • Joung-Liang Lan
    • 2
    • 5
    • 6
  • Chia-Wei Hsieh
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of RadiologyTaichung Veterans General HospitalTaichungRepublic of China
  2. 2.Division of Allergy, Immunology and RheumatologyTaichung Veterans General HospitalTaichungRepublic of China
  3. 3.Central Taiwan University of Science and TechnologyTaichungRepublic of China
  4. 4.Hungkuang UniversityTaichungRepublic of China
  5. 5.National Yang Ming UniversityTaipeiRepublic of China
  6. 6.National Chung Hsing UniversityTaichungRepublic of China
  7. 7.TaichungRepublic of China

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