Clinical Rheumatology

, Volume 26, Issue 8, pp 1275–1277

Clinical features of scleroderma patients with contracture of phalanges

  • Ryuichi Ashida
  • Hironobu Ihn
  • Yoshihiro Mimura
  • Masatoshi Jinnin
  • Yoshihide Asano
  • Masahide Kubo
  • Kunihiko Tamaki
Original Article

Abstract

Contracture of phalanges (CP) is a frequent complication of patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). The objective of this study was to examine the prevalance of CP in patients with SSc and investigate the clinical and laboratory features of SSc patients with CP. Three hundred and fifty patients with SSc were examined. CP was found in 164 of the 350 patients (47%) with SSc. The prevalence of oesophageal involvement, pulmonary fibrosis or heart involvement was significantly greater in the patients with CP than that in those without CP. Our study suggested that the presence of CP may be a marker of oesophageal involvement, pulmonary fibrosis and heart involvement.

Keywords

Heart involvement Oesophageal involvement Pulmonary fibrosis 

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Copyright information

© Clinical Rheumatology 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ryuichi Ashida
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hironobu Ihn
    • 1
    • 3
  • Yoshihiro Mimura
    • 1
  • Masatoshi Jinnin
    • 1
  • Yoshihide Asano
    • 1
  • Masahide Kubo
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kunihiko Tamaki
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Dermatology, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of TokyoTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Department of Dermatology, Mita HospitalInternationl University of Health and WelfareTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Department of Dermatology & Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Faculty of Medical and Pharmaceutical SciencesKumamoto UniversityKumamotoJapan

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