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Hadron production in relativistic nuclear collisions: thermal hadron source or hadronizing quark-gluon plasma?

  • C. Spieles
  • H. Stöcker
  • C. Greiner
Theoretical physics

Abstract.

Measured hadron yields from relativistic nuclear collisions can be equally well understood in two physically distinct models, namely a static thermal hadronic source vs. a time-dependent, nonequilibrium hadronization off a quark-gluon plasma droplet. Due to the time-dependent particle evaporation off the hadronic surface in the latter approach the hadron ratios change (by factors of \(\lessapprox 5\)) in time. Final particle yields reflect time averages over the actual thermodynamic properties of the system at a certain stage of the evolution. Calculated hadron, strangelet and (anti-)cluster yields as well as freeze-out times are presented for different systems. Due to strangeness distillation the system moves rapidly out of the \(T\), \(\mu_q\) plane into the \(\mu_s\)-sector. Strangeness to baryon ratios \(f_s=1-2\) prevail during a considerable fraction (50%) of the time evolution (i.e. \(\Lambda\)-droplets or even \(\Xi^-\)-droplets form the system at the late stage: The possibility of observing this time evolution via two-particle correlations is discussed). The observed hadron ratios require \(T_c\approx 160\) MeV and \(B^{1/4}\gtrapprox 200\) MeV. If the present model is fit to the extrapolated hadron yields, metastable hypermatter can only be produced with a probability \(p<10^{-8}\) for \(A \ge 4\).

Keywords

Time Evolution Ratio Change Considerable Fraction Hadron Production Distinct Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Spieles
    • 1
  • H. Stöcker
    • 1
  • C. Greiner
    • 2
  1. 1. Institut für Theoretische Physik, J. W. Goethe-Universität, D-60054 Frankfurt am Main, Germany DE
  2. 2. Institut für Theoretische Physik, J. Liebig-Universität, D-35392 Gießen, Germany DE

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