neurogenetics

, Volume 10, Issue 1, pp 73–77

A novel mutation in the MFSD8 gene in late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

  • E. Stogmann
  • S. El Tawil
  • J. Wagenstaller
  • A. Gaber
  • S. Edris
  • A. Abdelhady
  • E. Assem-Hilger
  • F. Leutmezer
  • S. Bonelli
  • C. Baumgartner
  • F. Zimprich
  • T. M. Strom
  • A. Zimprich
Original Article

Abstract

Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL) are lysosomal storage disorders and constitute the most common group of progressive neurodegenerative diseases in childhood. Most NCLs are inherited in a recessive manner and are clinically characterised by a variable age at onset, epileptic seizures, psychomotor decline, visual impairment and premature death. To date, eight causative genes have been identified to underlie various clinical forms of NCL. We performed a genome-wide linkage analysis followed by sequencing the recently described NCL gene MFSD8 in three affected and three unaffected members of a consanguineous Egyptian family with an autosomal recessively inherited progressive neurodegenerative disorder. The clinical picture of the patients was compatible with a late infantile NCL (LINCL); however, impairment of the visual system was not a cardinal symptom in the respective family. By linkage analysis, we identified two putative loci on chromosome 1p36.11-p35.1 and 4q28.1-q28.2. The latter locus (4q28.1-q28.2) contained the MFSD8 gene, comprising a novel homozygous missense mutation in exon 5 (c.362a>g /p.Tyr121Cys), which segregated with the disease in the three affected sibs. We describe a novel mutation in the previously identified MFSD8 gene in a family with a common phenotype of LINCL, but no clinical report of vision loss. Our results enlarge the mutational and perhaps the nosological spectrum of one of the recently identified subtypes of NCL, called CLN7.

Keywords

MFSD8 gene Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis Missense mutation 

Supplementary material

10048_2008_153_MOESM1_ESM.gif (5 kb)
Supplemental Fig. 1

Protein alignment of the sequence encompassing the Y121C mutation indicate conservation of the Tyrosine residue among the following: Homo sapiens (NP_689991.1); Pan troglodytes (XP_526685.2); Mus musculus (NP_082416.2); Gallus gallus (XP_420463.1); Drosophila melanogaster (NP_648107.3); Danio rerio (NP_001038513.1). (GIF 5.05 KB)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Stogmann
    • 1
  • S. El Tawil
    • 2
  • J. Wagenstaller
    • 3
  • A. Gaber
    • 2
  • S. Edris
    • 4
  • A. Abdelhady
    • 2
  • E. Assem-Hilger
    • 1
  • F. Leutmezer
    • 1
  • S. Bonelli
    • 1
  • C. Baumgartner
    • 1
  • F. Zimprich
    • 1
  • T. M. Strom
    • 3
    • 5
  • A. Zimprich
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurologyGeneral Hospital, Medical University of ViennaViennaAustria
  2. 2.Department of NeurologyAin Shams UniversityCairoEgypt
  3. 3.Institute of Human GeneticsGSF National Research Centre for Environment and HealthNeuherbergGermany
  4. 4.Department of Molecular BiologyAin Shams UniversityCairoEgypt
  5. 5.Institute of Human GeneticsTechnical University MunichMunichGermany

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