Journal of Artificial Organs

, Volume 16, Issue 3, pp 382–385 | Cite as

Venovenous ECMO as a bridge to lung transplant and a protective strategy for subsequent primary graft dysfunction

  • Don HayesJr.
  • Mark Galantowicz
  • Andrew R. Yates
  • Thomas J. Preston
  • Heidi M. Mansour
  • Patrick I. McConnell
Case Report

Abstract

Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is an established therapy for primary graft dysfunction (PGD) in adults after lung transplant, while venovenous (VV) ECMO is an evolving therapy that can bridge patients to lung transplantation. This report describes a case of relatively quick improvement of grade 3 PGD, based on the PaO2/FIO2 (P/F) ratio, in a 17-year-old patient with cystic fibrosis who was bridged to lung transplantation with ambulatory VV ECMO and then received support with VV ECMO as a protective strategy during the initial phases of PGD after lung transplantation.

Keywords

Cystic fibrosis Lung transplantation Venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation Preventative Primary graft dysfunction Protective 

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Society for Artificial Organs 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Don HayesJr.
    • 1
  • Mark Galantowicz
    • 2
  • Andrew R. Yates
    • 1
  • Thomas J. Preston
    • 3
  • Heidi M. Mansour
    • 4
  • Patrick I. McConnell
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsThe Ohio State University College of Medicine, Nationwide Children’s HospitalColumbusUSA
  2. 2.Department of SurgeryThe Ohio State University College of Medicine, Nationwide Children’s HospitalColumbusUSA
  3. 3.Department of Cardiovascular Perfusion, Heart CenterNationwide Children’s HospitalColumbusUSA
  4. 4.Department of Pharmaceutical SciencesUniversity of Kentucky College of PharmacyLexingtonUSA

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