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Journal of Artificial Organs

, Volume 16, Issue 2, pp 157–163 | Cite as

Numerical analysis of blood flow distribution in 4- and 3-branch vascular grafts

  • Chikako KonouraEmail author
  • Takanobu Yagi
  • Masanori Nakamura
  • Kiyotaka Iwasaki
  • Yi Qian
  • Shigeo Okuda
  • Akihiro Yoshitake
  • Hideyuki Shimizu
  • Ryohei Yozu
  • Mitsuo UmezuEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

Trifurcated arch grafts (3-branch grafts) are now being used to repair the thoracic aorta in addition to conventional arch grafts (4-branch grafts). The anatomical shape of the 3-branch graft is different from the original vessel, so it is necessary for clinical application to evaluate blood flow distribution in the graft to assess whether there is adequate blood flow to the target organs. To achieve this, we developed a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method to evaluate blood flow distribution in the grafts. Aortic blood flow was measured by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI), and flow distribution into the branched vessels was obtained. The MRI image was used to create a patient-specific image model that represents the geometry of the aortic arch. The CFD analysis method was employed to determine a boundary condition of the blood flow analysis in the aorta using a patient-specific image model. We also created simplified models of 4-branch and 3-branch grafts and used our CFD analysis method to compare blood flow distribution among simplified models. It was found that blood flow distribution in the descending aorta was 71.3 % for the 4-branch graft and 67.7 % for the 3-branch graft, indicating that a sum of branching flow in the 3-branch graft was almost the same as the one in the 4-branch graft. Therefore, there is no major concern about implanting a new 3-branch graft. Our CFD analysis method may be applied to estimate blood flow distribution of a newly developed vascular graft prior to its clinical use and provide useful information for safe use of the graft.

Keywords

Arch graft Blood flow distribution CFD PC-MRI 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Challenging Exploratory Research from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science. This work was aided by the project “Biomedical Engineering Research for Advanced Medical Treatment Using Nonclinical Study” of the Research Institute for Science and Engineering (08L01) of Waseda University.

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Society for Artificial Organs 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chikako Konoura
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Takanobu Yagi
    • 3
    • 4
  • Masanori Nakamura
    • 4
    • 5
  • Kiyotaka Iwasaki
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
  • Yi Qian
    • 4
    • 6
  • Shigeo Okuda
    • 7
  • Akihiro Yoshitake
    • 8
  • Hideyuki Shimizu
    • 8
  • Ryohei Yozu
    • 8
  • Mitsuo Umezu
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
    Email author
  1. 1.TWIns (Tokyo Women’s Medical University-Waseda University Joint Institution) for Advanced Biomedical SciencesTokyoJapan
  2. 2.School of Health SciencesTokyo University of TechnologyTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Faculty of Science and EngineeringWaseda UniversityTokyoJapan
  4. 4.Research Institute for Science and EngineeringWaseda UniversityTokyoJapan
  5. 5.Saitama University Graduate School of Science and EngineeringSaitamaJapan
  6. 6.Australian School of Advanced MedicineMacquarie UniversityMacquarie ParkAustralia
  7. 7.Division of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of RadiologyKeio University School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  8. 8.Division of Cardiovascular Surgery, Department of SurgeryKeio University School of MedicineTokyoJapan

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