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Journal of Artificial Organs

, Volume 15, Issue 2, pp 128–133 | Cite as

Alteration of LV end-diastolic volume by controlling the power of the continuous-flow LVAD, so it is synchronized with cardiac beat: development of a native heart load control system (NHLCS)

  • Akihide UmekiEmail author
  • Takashi NishimuraEmail author
  • Masahiko Ando
  • Yoshiaki Takewa
  • Kenji Yamazaki
  • Shunei Kyo
  • Minoru Ono
  • Tomonori Tsukiya
  • Toshihide Mizuno
  • Yoshiyuki Taenaka
  • Eisuke Tatsumi
Original Article

Abstract

There are many reports comparing pulsatile and continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (LVAD). But continuous-flow LVAD with the pulsatile driving technique had not been tried or discussed before our group’s report. We have previously developed and introduced a power-control unit for a centrifugal LVAD (EVAHEART®; Sun Medical), which can change the speed of rotation so it is synchronized with the heart beat. By use of this unit we analyzed the end-diastolic volume (EDV) to determine whether it is possible to change the native heart load. We studied 5 goats with normal hearts and 5 goats with acute LV dysfunction because of micro-embolization of the coronary artery. We used 4 modes, “circuit-clamp”, “continuous”, “counter-pulse”, and “co-pulse”, with the bypass rate (BR) 100%. We raised the speed of rotation of the LVAD in the diastolic phase with the counter-pulse mode, and raised it in the systolic phase with the co-pulse mode. As a result, the EDV decreased in the counter-pulse mode and increased in the co-pulse mode, compared with the continuous mode (p < 0.05), in both the normal and acute-heart-failure models. This result means it may be possible to achieve favorable EDV and native heart load by controlling the rotation of continuous-flow LVAD, so it is synchronized with the cardiac beat. This novel driving system may be of great benefit to patients with end-stage heart failure, especially those with ischemic etiology.

Keywords

Continuous-flow LVAD Synchronization with cardiac beat End-diastolic volume Heart load 

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Society for Artificial Organs 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Akihide Umeki
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Takashi Nishimura
    • 2
    Email author
  • Masahiko Ando
    • 2
  • Yoshiaki Takewa
    • 1
  • Kenji Yamazaki
    • 3
  • Shunei Kyo
    • 2
  • Minoru Ono
    • 2
  • Tomonori Tsukiya
    • 1
  • Toshihide Mizuno
    • 1
  • Yoshiyuki Taenaka
    • 1
  • Eisuke Tatsumi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Artificial OrganNational Cerebral and Cardiovascular CenterSuitaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Cardiothoracic SurgeryThe University of TokyoTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Department of Cardiovascular SurgeryTokyo Women’s Medical UniversityTokyoJapan

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