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Applied Hydrogeology

, Volume 2, Issue 2, pp 33–42 | Cite as

Groundwater Resources In Hard Rock; Experiences from The Hvaler Study, Southeastern Norway

  • D. Banks
  • E. Rohr-Torp
  • H. Skarphagen
Article

Abstract

Investigations in a newly constructed subsea road tunnel in the Iddefjord granite at Hvaler and test-pumping of boreholes on land indicate that a topographic or geophysical anomaly is no guarantee of a substantially transmissive fracture zone. Many prominent fracture zones appear to have depressed transmissivity due to secondary swelling-clay mineral infillings. No current geophysical technique can adequately distinguish these zones from transmissive ones. Given that siting of boreholes on the basis of geology alone can be unreliable, hydrogeologists should concentrate on quantifying the chances of a successful boring, and optimizing those chances by sensible location, favourable borehole orientation and use of artificial enhancement techniques.

Keywords

Waste Water Water Management Water Pollution Fracture Zone Groundwater Resource 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Banks
    • 1
  • E. Rohr-Torp
    • 2
  • H. Skarphagen
    • 2
  1. 1.Scott Wilson Kirkpatrick and Partners, Bayheath House, Rose Will West, Chesterfield, Derbyshire, S40 1JF, United KingdomGB
  2. 2.Norges geologiske undersøkelse, Postboks 5348 - Majorstua, N-0304 Oslo, NorwayNO

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