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Hernia

, Volume 6, Issue 3, pp 120–123 | Cite as

Rives-Stoppa procedure for repair of large incisional hernias: experience with 57 patients

  • J. Bauer
  • M. Harris
  • S. Gorfine
  • I. Kreel
Original Article

Abstract

Background. The use of prosthetic materials in tension-free incisional hernia repairs has diminished reherniation rates markedly; however, infection, intestinal fistulization, and seroma formation have been reported after repairs. Use of the Rives-Stoppa procedure for incisional hernia repair, in which the prosthesis is placed between the rectus abdominis muscle and the posterior sheath, may reduce occurrence of these problems.

Methods and materials. Over a 6-year period 57 open abdominal wall incisional hernia repairs were performed using the Rives-Stoppa technique; 15 (26.3%) had previously undergone incisional hernia repair. The prosthetic materials used were polypropylene, expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE), and ePTFE with perforations. The prosthesis size ranged from 8×8 cm to 20×28 cm (mean area 199.6 cm2). Follow-up consisted of an office visit 12 months postoperatively and at least one subsequent office visit or telephone interview; mean follow-up time was 34.9 months (range 11.7–81.9).

Results. There were no hernia recurrences (except in one patient whose prosthesis was removed), gastrointestinal complications, fistulas, or deaths. Seromas occurred postoperatively in seven patients (12.3%). Two patients (3.5%) had wound infections that required removal of the prosthesis.

Conclusions. In this series the Rives-Stoppa technique had excellent long-term results, with minimal morbidity, in patients with large primary or recurrent incisional hernias. The absence of serious complications and hernia recurrences in patients with grafts in place suggests that the Rives-Stoppa procedure is the repair of choice in such patients.

Hernia, incisional Rives-Stoppa Prosthesis Herniorrhaphy Seroma 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Bauer
    • 1
  • M. Harris
    • 1
  • S. Gorfine
    • 1
  • I. Kreel
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Surgery, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital, 25 East 69th Street, New York, NY 10021, USAUSA

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