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Artificial Life and Robotics

, Volume 15, Issue 4, pp 385–388 | Cite as

Some properties of four-dimensional parallel Turing machines

  • Yasuo UchidaEmail author
  • Makoto Sakamoto
  • Ayumi Taniue
  • Ryuju Katamune
  • Takao Ito
  • Hiroshi Furutani
  • Michio Kono
Original Article
  • 58 Downloads

Abstract

Informally, the parallel Turing machine (PTM) proposed by Wiedermann is a set of identical usual sequential Turing machines (STMs) cooperating on two common tapes: a storage tape and an input tape. Moreover, STMs which represent the individual processors of a parallel computer can multiply themselves in the course of computation. On the other hand, during the past 7 years or so, automata on a four-dimensional tape have been proposed as computational models of four-dimensional pattern processing, and several properties of such automata have been obtained. We proposed a four-dimensional parallel Turing machine (4-PTM), and dealt with a hardware-bounded 4-PTM in which each side-length of each input tape is equivalent. We believe that this machine is useful in measuring the parallel computational complexity of three-dimensional images. In this work, we continued the study of the 3-PTM, in which each side-length of each input tape is equivalent, and investigated some of its accepting powers.

Key words

Computational complexity Four-dimensional automaton Hardware-bounded computation Nondeterminism Parallel Turing machine 

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References

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Copyright information

© International Symposium on Artificial Life and Robotics (ISAROB). 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yasuo Uchida
    • 1
    Email author
  • Makoto Sakamoto
    • 2
  • Ayumi Taniue
    • 2
  • Ryuju Katamune
    • 2
  • Takao Ito
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Furutani
    • 2
  • Michio Kono
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Business AdministrationUbe National College of TechnologyUbeJapan
  2. 2.Department of Computer Science and Systems EngineeringUniversity of MiyazakiMiyazakiJapan

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